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Absence of Vision

Absence of Vision

  • 22-year-old male presented with absence of vision in left eye since birth, nasal blockage for three years, and headache for one month.
  • Figure 1. Plain radiography images. Foci of calcification are noted in the left orbit near its medial aspect compared to the right orbit.
  • Figure 2. Axial CT images. Left globe shows calcification along its posterior segment, appears shrunken, and looks like a calcified lump.
  • Figure 3. Coronal CT images: Left globe shows calcification along its posterior segment, appears shrunken, and looks like a calcified lump.
  • Figure 4. Sagittal CT images: Left globe shows calcification along its posterior segment, appears shrunken, and looks like a calcified lump.
  • Diagnosis: Phthisis bulbi
  • On CT scan with plain study: Left eye ball appears small with calcified lens and globe.
  • Phthisis bulbi, also known as end-stage eye, is an atrophic scarred, and disorganized globe that may result from a variety of severe ocular insults.
  • Clinical signs: Decreased intraocular pressure.
  • Prognosis: Phthisis bulbi is an end-stage condition with no chance of improvement.
  • Trochlear calcifications may occur in adults as aging-related normal variants or may be seen in young patients with diabetes mellitus. They typically have a superomedial location within the orbit.
  • Metastatic calcification: abnormal calcium and phosphate metabolism.

Case History: A 22-year-old male presented with absence of vision in left eye since birth, nasal blockage for three years, and headache for one month.

Comments

Phthisis bulbi; multiple etiologies including prior trauma, glaucoma.

herbert @

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