News

Three-T MRI bolsters diagnosis of focal epilepsy

A recent study at the Oregon Health and Science University in Portland has confirmed that 3T MRI improves on 1.5T MRI for detecting and characterizing structural brain abnormalities in patients with focal epilepsy.
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Ob/gyns endorse uterine artery embolization as safe, effective for fibroids

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has recommended uterine artery embolization as an alternative to hysterectomy in the management of leiomyomas, according to a statement published in its latest practice bulletin.
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Brain imaging links chronic insomnia to reversible cognitive deficits

MR neuroimaging research has found that cognitive processes relating to verbal fluency are compromised in people with insomnia despite the absence of a behavioral deficit. These specific brain function alterations can be reversed, however, through nonpharmacological treatment with six weeks of sleep therapy.
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CT proves its worth for investigating bowel obstruction

Two and half years worth of data suggest that CT is the most accurate, cost-effective imaging modality for diagnosing the causes of large bowel obstruction, according to investigators in the U.K.
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PET leads to treatment changes in majority of colorectal cancers

The largest multi-institutional study to date examining the effect of PET on the management of recurrent colorectal cancer has found that its finding led to change in the treatment plans for more than half of patients.
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Thoughtful tactics can lead to great group practices

Most radiology practices are governed haphazardly, act unpredictably, and tend to succeed in spite of what they do rather than because of it.
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Covidien advises customers about impending molybdenum shortage

Covidien has alerted customers for its technetium-99m generators about impending shortages caused by the unexpected shutdown of the Dutch nuclear reactor that serves as its main source of molybdenum-99.
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MultiHance outperforms Omniscan for enhancement of brain tumors

Although both gadobenate dimeglumine and gadodiamide are gadolinium-based agents, the former provides more conspicuous enhancement for imaging of brain lesions, according to results from an international multicenter trial. Findings could lead to further improvements in the management of these patients.
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Nuclear medicine braces for effects of Petten reactor shutdown

An unscheduled shutdown of the High Flux Reactor at Petten in the Netherlands has raised concern about a possible interruption of molybdenum-99 supplies for nuclear medicine procedures in Europe and North America.
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Optical brain imaging uncovers secret of newborn's first words

A new study could explain why "daddy" and "mommy" are often a baby's first words. The human brain may be hard-wired to recognize certain repetition patterns.
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MRI strategy supplies early warning of osteoarthritis

A novel MRI technique that tracks naturally occurring polymers in cartilage can lead to the diagnosis of early-stage osteoarthritis and may lead to better drug treatment and a reduction in the need for joint replacement surgeries.
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Image Gently alliance pushes pediatric radiation dose standards

In a breakthrough for pediatric radiology, the Alliance for Radiation Safety in Pediatric Imaging hosted the first pediatric CT vendor summit aimed at the standardization of radiation dose settings and display language for pediatric CT scanners.
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Panel pans FDG-PET evidence for expanded Medicare coverage

A Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services advisory panel has found that most available clinical data for nine conditionally approved cancer indications of FDG-PET, evaluated by the National Oncologic PET Registry and a separate Canadian study, are too ambivalent to support Medicare coverage.
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PET links brain chemistry, personality

In the first study of its kind, German researchers have shown a correlation between healthy people's personalities and their brain chemistry using PET. Findings could lead to better understanding and treatment of addictive behavior.
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Thoracic aortic stenting tops surgery for management of blunt trauma

Endovascular repair is better and safer than surgery for the treatment of blunt thoracic aortic trauma, according to the largest review of clinical data to date comparing both procedures. Stent-grafts could save more lives and reduce the risk of paraplegia, a frequent surgical complication.
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Over-the-counter anesthetic gel reduces mammogram discomfort

The simple application of lidocaine gel may reduce the breast discomfort some women experience during mammography exams, according to the results of a clinical trial from Idaho.
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Carotid ultrasound predicts stroke, heart attack risk

Evaluation of carotid artery plaque density performed on serial ultrasound scans could help identify patients at high risk for a heart attack or other adverse cardiovascular events, according to Austrian researchers.
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MRI spots early biological markers of Alzheimer's

The era of postautopsy confirmation of Alzheimer's disease may be coming to an end. MR imaging could spot signs of brain deterioration predictive of cognitive decline months, even years, before the onset of dementia, according to recent studies performed in Canada, Europe, and the U.S.
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Antihistamine, common drugs safely treat allergy-like contrast reactions

Patients who have had acute allergic-like reactions to nonionic iodinated contrast material rarely develop serious long-term problems and can be treated safely with commonly used medications, according to a study conducted by researchers at the University of Michigan Hospitals in Ann Arbor.
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New CMS anti-referral rules tighten knot on leasing arrangements

Following its charge to reduce costly imaging overutilization, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has announced more stringent prohibitions against self-referral practices. Final Stark rules for the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment System for 2009 could force providers to restructure numerous space and equipment arrangements.
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Convenience helps mammography facilities keep patients

Location! Location! Location! The magic word for retail business success may also have a huge impact on breast imaging centers. Patients cite convenience to home or work as the main reason they changed mammography facilities, according to a recent study by researchers at the University of Cincinnati.
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Study sheds light on contrast-induced nephropathy in high-risk patients

Researchers have established the safety of nonionic contrast media in adult and pediatric patients, but questions remained regarding the use of low- and iso-osmolar agents, particularly in patients at high risk of developing contrast-induced nephropathy. Now results from a prospective multicenter study done in China and the U.S. suggest that risk is equally low with either type of agent.
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CTA beats MRA, ultrasound for early evaluation of peripheral arterial disease

Multislice CT angiography should be the preferred choice over MR angiography or duplex ultrasound for initial evaluation of patients with suspected peripheral arterial disease.
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MSCT matches cardiac MRI for emergency myocardial infarction assessment

Multislice CT is just as accurate as MRI in assessing myocardial infarct size in an emergency setting, according to a recent study conducted by researchers in France and the U.S. The latest data validate previous findings suggesting delayed-enhancement myocardial CT correlates well with measures of infarction size done with cardiac MR.
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Coronary CTA proves cost-effective for low-risk acute chest pain patients

Massachusetts General Hospital researchers have added to the roll of preliminary evidence suggesting that 64-slice coronary CT angiography can serve as a useful adjunct for emergency department patients who present with acute chest pain.
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Digital mammography struggles with PACS compatibility glitches

A recent advisory by the FDA urging breast imaging facilities to ensure compatibility between full-field digital mammography systems and PACS exposed an ongoing problem: Interoperability issues persist as some vendors fail to comply with healthcare digital imaging standards.
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Slow implementation bogs down Medicare-mandated imaging accreditation

Pro-radiology forces are claiming mandated Medicare accreditation as a victory. They will have to wait until January 2012, however, to see the actual implementation of federal law passed in July to mandate accreditation for high-tech medical imaging covered by outpatient Medicare.
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Whole-body PET/CT and 3T MR perform equally well for lung cancer staging

No clear winner has emerged in a head-to-head comparison of whole-body FDG-PET/CT and whole-body 3T MRI for non-small cell lung cancer staging. Unenhanced PET/CT proved better for detecting metastatic lymph nodes and soft-tissue involvement, while MR was more sensitive to the presence of brain and liver metastases.
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Proponents praise radiopharmaceutical reimbursement overhaul, with caveats

Bexxar and Zevalin have become the poster children of inadequate reimbursement for radiopharmaceuticals. Despite recent Congressional action to freeze their payment rates until January 2010, advocates for these radioimmunotherapic agents say more should be done to support the application of these clinically valuable but extremely expensive drugs.
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MRI zeroes in on medial meniscal tears

Studies from Korea and the U.S. show that MR imaging of the knee is a reliable and accurate test for the detection of specific subtypes of medial meniscal tears. Good understanding of MR-depicted anatomic features helps identify false-positive injuries of the menisci and avoid unnecessary surgeries.
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ACR wins contract to accredit government radiation oncology facilities

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has awarded a three-year contract to the American College of Radiology to serve as the accrediting organization for 33 VA hospital radiation oncology facilities across the country.
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Ultrasound serves as eyes of robotic surgery

Robotic tools that could one day perform surgery on battlefields, in space, and at remote locations with minimal human guidance use 3D ultrasound as a key component.
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Contrast-induced nephropathy fears ease

Ten years of clinical data from more than 30,000 patients suggest the estimated risk of sustaining renal damage from iodinated contrast media may have been blown out of proportion, according to Columbia University researchers. With proper scientific validation, contrast may be used even in patients with renal failure.
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MRI breast cancer staging proves benefits, shortcomings

A metastudy by Australian and European researchers indicates that MR staging identifies additional disease in nearly one of five women previously diagnosed with breast cancer. It also suggests that women may undergo more extensive surgeries than originally planned because of false-positive MR findings.
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CT radiation causes implanted devices to malfunction

The FDA cautioned healthcare CT users July 16 that ionized radiation generated during CT exams may cause some implanted and external electronic medical devices to malfunction.
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GAO recommends preauthorization to slow explosive Medicare imaging growth

To the chagrin of imaging advocates, a Government Accountability Office study has found that preauthorization may be best way for Medicare to slow the rapid growth of outpatient MR, CT, and other high-tech imaging services.
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Novel MR technique uncovers neural hub of human thought

A novel use of MR has set the stage for neuroscientists to unravel the trillions of neural connections in the human brain and with them a fundamental understanding of brain function and dysfunction.
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Proponents hail passage of Medicare bill as triumph for physicians, patients

A showdown between President Bush and Congress over Medicare physician payments concluded Tuesday when the House and Senate overrode the president's veto of HR 6331. The aftermath brings relief to physicians until 2009 and could have significant long-term implications for radiologists and imaging practice.
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Palpation fails to reduce breast cancer mortality

Experience compiled from nearly half a million women suggests that breast self-examination has a negligible effect in reducing breast cancer-related deaths. The practice may even be putting an unnecessary strain on breast care resources, according to researchers in Denmark.
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Congress overrides White House veto of physician payment bill

President Bush vetoed the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act of 2008 Tuesday, giving the green light to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to start processing physician payment claims with a 10.6% cut. But backers of the legislation rapidly orchestrated a response in the House and Senate to override the veto later in the day.
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Fewer students take ARRT exam

The number of students taking radiography and radiation therapy examinations for the first time slowed in 2007, signaling that educational programs are scaling back admissions and the pool of qualified technologists is meeting practice demand. Only nuclear medicine saw a sharp increase -- 17.1 % over 2006 -- although those numbers too are expected to decline, according to the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists.
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Use of nighthawk services fails to match expectations

Contrary to concerns about teleradiology encroachment, a Yale University survey finds that use of external after-hours services accounts for a small percentage of radiology practices' total interpretations. Interpretation by foreign-trained radiologists is not widespread.
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White House makes moves to veto Medicare physician payment bill

White House officials urged Republican senators Friday to reverse their support of a Senate bill that would set aside an impending 10.6% physician payment cut from Medicare, allowing President Bush to veto the legislation.
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SNM panel finds no easy path to expand molybdenum-99 supplies

A draft report from an SNM expert panel has found no quick fix for the medical imaging community's molybdenum-99m supply problems. Its results suggest that North American healthcare providers will continue to depend on Canada's National Research Universal reactor in Chalk River, ON, for most of the precursor isotope of technetium-99m for several years as plans for alternative sources move toward implementation.
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Senate passes Medicare bill to avert physician payment cuts

The Senate passed key legislation July 9 that forestalls a 10.6% cut in Medicare physician payments following intense lobbying from patient and physician advocacy groups over the Independence Day Congressional recess. The 69-30 tally in favor of the bill makes it veto-proof.
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MDS files $1.6 billion suit over abandoned Mo-99 reactors

MDS has filed a $1.6 billion breach of contract lawsuit against Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. and the Canadian government for their decision in May to halt development of a twin nuclear reactor complex designed to provide a long-term supply of molybdenum-99, to be refined and distributed by MDS.
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Certification acknowledges care of dying patients

The American Board of Radiology now offers a certificate in hospice and palliative care, designed for doctors whose work involves the care of seriously ill and dying patients.
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PET spots functional signs of early coronary artery disease in diabetes patients

Molecular imaging researchers have shown that coronary vascular dysfunction uncovered with PET may be diagnostically more powerful than vascular ultrasound or CT calcium tests for identifying early coronary artery disease in type 2 diabetes patients.
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Imaging informatics offers key to reshaping radiology's future

With potential professional threats seeming to lurk around every corner, radiologists can expect medical imaging informatics to serve as their best defense from now until the year 2015. That was the message of Dr. Eliot Siegel's Moreton Lecture at the 2008 American College of Radiology meeting and Chapter Leadership Conference in Washington, DC.
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Medicare fee schedule proposal could force nonrads to close office-based imaging services

Proposed rules announced June 30 for the 2009 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule feature provisions that could both hinder and help radiologists who perform outpatient imaging practices. The proposal, issued by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, asks for a 5.4% cut in physician payments, but it also raises the possibility of harsh regulations to make it harder for nonradiologists to provide office-based imaging services.
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Report from BIC: First impressions count in mammography malpractice

Breast imagers can avert liability claims by conducting a malpractice prevention inspection of their mammography facility, beginning with the receptionist.
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Urologists eye CT scanners as reimbursement drops

Faced with a potentially large drop in revenue for outpatient treatment of prostate cancer, some urologists have turned to CT scanning as a means to counter the shortfall.
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Fusion imaging bolsters prostate cancer management

Fusing SPECT with MR or CT images enhances detection of prostate cancer recurrence and can improve clinical management, according to New York University researchers.
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MR provides incomplete picture of white matter in multiple sclerosis patients

Appearances may be deceiving on T2-weighted MR images of white matter plaques in patients with multiple sclerosis. White matter abnormalities may be more widespread than they appear, according to researchers at Duke University Medical Center.
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Medicare begins PET reimbursement for segment of Alzheimer's population

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services announced Thursday that it will begin reimbursing PET scans for some patients with suspected Alzheimer's.
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CTA reconstruction targets renal transplant studies

CT angiography has proved a reliable alternative to catheter angiography to evaluate living renal donors. The next step -- defining the best image reconstruction method -- has researchers busy.
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Greek imaging system provides MITIS touch in ob/gyn

Digital imaging services have now penetrated ob/gyn departments, thanks to a system being tested by researchers in Athens. MITIS uses the Web to manage and process obstetric, gynecologic, and radiologic data.
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MR rounds out patient management for UAE

MR imaging prior to fibroid embolization therapy can discover existing pelvic pathology, including adenomyosis and endometrial lesions. This can result in a decision not to proceed with uterine artery embolization, according to researchers at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.
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Stack image viewing comes to a radiology presentation near you

Representing 3D radiologic information during traditional presentations can be a problem. Tackling the challenge, researchers at the University of Michigan and Yale University have developed a tool that allows presenters to manipulate image stacks just as they would using a PACS workstation.
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MSCT unwraps mummy's mysteries

Although it was archeologists who discovered the mummified remains of Harwa, an artisan who lived during the XXII or XXIII dynasty, it took multislice CT to put a face on the 3000-year-old Egyptian. An article in the September issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology describes Italian researchers' efforts to reconstruct the mummy's face with the aid of MSCT.
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Report from SMI: Burgeoning molecular imaging field makes clinical connections

Society for Molecular Imaging program director Dr. David Piwnica-Worms kicked off this year's annual meeting with highlights of research showing how this emerging field has progressed in the past year.
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MRI follows biomechanics of exercise

Rather than extrapolate data from ex vivo and animal studies, researchers can use MR imaging directly on humans to measure T2 changes in knee cartilage caused by running. Direct, reproducible T2 measurements can help in the development of osteoarthritis drugs and in understanding how cartilage develops in childhood, according to researchers at Penn State University.
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CT and MR gain ground in plaque detection

CT and MR are both powerful tools in detecting early, subclinical vulnerable plaque. They can prove useful in assessing changes in the blood vessel wall and identifying high-risk patients who may benefit from treatment, thereby preventing atherosclerosis.
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Three-D CTA helps gastric cancer management

Multislice CT angiography with 3D reconstruction helps in surgical planning for patients with gastric cancer, according to a study published in the July issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.
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False-positive rate for screening mammography drops

The cumulative risk of receiving a false-positive result is about 20% for women receiving mammograms twice a year. This number, produced after 20 years of screening experience, is smaller then that reported in previous studies, according to a study published in August in Cancer online.
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Cancer death risk rises with full-body CT screening

Asymptomatic patients seeking full-body CT scans face an increasing risk of dying from cancer due to radiation exposure, according to a study published in the September issue of Radiology.
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CT follow-up spots gastric bypass complications

Gastric bypass has been recognized as a successful surgical approach to morbid obesity. The risky procedure has a high likelihood of complications, however. While not an option in the past, CT can now help spot postoperative trouble, according to a study in the June issue of Radiology.
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Healthcare law signals change for radiology practice

The 2004 Medicare Modernization Act, signed into law late last year, will bring sweeping changes to medicine. Its effect on radiology is a subject of heated debate.
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Feds eye MR-guided focused ultrasound ablation

An MR-guided focused ultrasound ablation system may be the first of its kind to be approved for marketing in the U.S. The nod could come as early as October.
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FDG-PET staging benefits some breast cancer patients more than others

The impact of FDG-PET imaging on patients with advanced breast cancer varies. It affects the choice of treatment most in patients suspected of having locoregional recurrence who are being evaluated for response to treatment, according to researchers in Washington state.
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Drug-eluting stents enter periphery in U.S.

While drug-eluting stents have proved successful in repairing coronary arteries, the periphery has been more challenging. The first FDA-approved clinical trial of a drug-coated stent for a peripheral artery is slated to begin next month.
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Fetal MR predicts lung insufficiency in newborns

Infants with pulmonary hypoplasia require intensive care at birth. MR imaging can diagnose the condition prenatally by measuring lung volume and fluid level, thereby reducing mortality and morbidity rates, according to a study in the June issue of Radiology.
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Radiation risk poses challenge for women with pulmonary embolism

Young women may be receiving too much radiation when physicians rely on CT to make a pulmonary embolism diagnosis, according to a study presented at the American Roentgen Ray Society meeting in May.
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Radiologists surf Pacific as well as 'Net

Rather than hanging films, radiologists for Virtual Radiologic Consultants may soon be hanging 10. The teleradiology company has opened a facility in Hawaii to better accommodate the growing demand for 24/7 coverage.
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CT can replace cystoscopy in bladder cancer

Multislice spiral CT has proved its value in detecting bladder cancer. Now mounting evidence indicates that CT could replace cystoscopy, the invasive procedure that is standard of care for this indication.
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Radio-frequency introducer cuts through tough breast tissue

Dense tissue can be difficult to navigate during ultrasound- or MR-guided breast biopsies. The use of radio-frequency energy can enable physicians to easily penetrate dense connective tissue, allowing them to better target cancer lesions, according to a study published in the July issue of Radiology.
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CT inventor Godfrey Hounsfield dies

Sir Godfrey N. Hounsfield, who won the 1979 Nobel Prize in Medicine for inventing computed axial tomography, died Aug. 12. He was 84.
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Price is right for stopgap PACS

An imaging department that can't afford a full-blown PACS doesn't have to go without. Researchers at Reed College in Portland, OR, and the University of Washington developed a free self-contained miniature PACS for radiologists who want a simple method to view images.
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Lung RFA moves up a notch

Radio-frequency ablation keeps earning points as a safe and effective treatment alternative for patients with unresectable lung tumors. Studies from Italy and Japan have shown RFA can successfully treat lesions larger than 3 cm.
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Newest neural links go first in Alzheimer's patients

"Last hired, first fired" may apply to our brain functions. Myelin sheaths insulating neural connections that were developed last in life are the first to degenerate in people with Alzheimer's disease, according to research from the University of California, Los Angeles.
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CT tops standard assessment of cystic fibrosis

CT can better assess lung disease and its progression in children with cystic fibrosis than the current standard of care, which includes pulmonary function tests and chest x-rays, according to researchers from the Netherlands and Canada. It is not widely used in this population, however.
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MR-based software helps separate conjoined twins

A computer program that calculates blood flow through MR images played a key role in the separation of the conjoined twins in New York City last week, according to University of Illinois at Chicago researchers.
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RFA for liver breaks further ground

Radio-frequency ablation of tumors is going one step higher. Liver RFA -- usually confined to lesions 4 cm and smaller -- also works in large tumors with the aid of a special algorithm that does a better job of calculating probe placement, according to researchers in China.
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PET/CT proliferation sparks new training guidelines

As PET/CT scanners proliferate, particularly in community hospitals, readers may lack experience in one modality or the other. Now two leading organizations have convened a task force to address this concern and optimize image interpretation among users of the dual scanners.
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Smoking keeps arteries open after angioplasty

Increasing the level of carbon monoxide in the bloodstream following angioplasty and stent placement in the arteries of the legs may help prevent restenosis, according to Austrian researchers. The easiest way to accomplish this? By smoking cigarettes.
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Report from AHRA: Radiology sets sail from information island

PACS may have stolen the thunder at recent radiology conferences, but radiology information systems should not be ignored, according to a presentation at the American Healthcare Radiology Administrators meeting this week in Boston.
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Report from AHRA: Picking a digital assistant gets personal

Yellow notepads and Post-it notes no longer cut it for managing information in a busy imaging department. The move away from personal analog devices (PADs) to personal digital assistants (PDAs) carries challenges, however, according to speakers at the 2004 American Healthcare Radiology Administrators conference in Boston.
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FDA okays radiolabeled agent to image appendicitis

More than three years after the FDA decided NeutroSpec was safe and effective, it finally cleared the technetium-99m-labeled monoclonal antibody agent for imaging appendicitis. The drug will reduce the need to draw blood for white cell labeling.
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Perfusion MRI enters realm of dementia

MR's ability to chart structural atrophy associated with cognitive decline has constituted its primary use in imaging Alzheimer's disease. Now researchers have demonstrated an MR perfusion technique that shows hypoperfusion in similar brain regions to those seen in FDG-PET and HMPAO-SPECT studies.
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Huge jury award vindicates Yale radiologists

Three radiologists who claimed Yale University retaliated against them for raising questions about fraud and poor patient care were awarded $5.5 million by a Connecticut state jury last week.
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Voxel-based morphometry contributes to diagnosis of MCI

The ability to find markers indicative of early-stage Alzheimer's disease would be even more beneficial than the ability to distinguish Alzheimer's from other dementias. Voxel-based MR morphometry may play a role in finding such markers.
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Multislice CTA safely visualizes pediatric vascular anomalies

Catheter angiography's two main risk factors -- ionizing radiation and invasiveness -- present a particular challenge in young patients, who are often uncooperative. Multislice CT angiography overcomes these concerns, according to two studies published in the July issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.
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ACR takes over MQSA accreditation in California

The California Department of Health Services no longer provides Mammography Quality Standards Act accreditation to the more than 450 facilities already accredited by the CDHS in the state. As of May 1, 2004, the American College of Radiology is the only FDA-approved accreditation body for the state of California.
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FDG-PET distinguishes between early dementia and Alzheimer's disease

Patients in an early stage of Alzheimer's disease can benefit from disease-modifying treatments. Surrogate imaging markers of early AD pathology are needed for testing potential preventive therapies.
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PET boosts clinical confidence of Alzheimer's diagnosis

Adding FDG-PET to usual clinical methods permits physicians to distinguish Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia more accurately and with greater confidence, according to research presented at the International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders in Philadelphia on Sunday.
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Feeding frenzy calms down

Radiologists have been the most highly recruited physician specialists nationwide for the last three years. No more. Orthopedic surgeons have replaced them as the top recruit, according to a survey by Merritt, Hawkins & Associates.
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Visual review of MRI distinguishes dementias

While the MRI features of the different causes of dementia overlap considerably, researchers from the U.K. suggest that visual inspection of the scans is both simple and fast. It may aid in the differentiation between diseases when used in conjunction with clinical information and other imaging techniques.
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Imaging plays increased role in neurodegenerative dementias

Clinicians who diagnose Alzheimer's disease are increasingly looking to neuroimaging to help make earlier diagnoses, differentiate dementias, and monitor therapeutic progress, according to Dr. Steven T. DeKosky, neurology department chair and director of the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center at the University of Pittsburgh.
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Lung CAD receives FDA approval

The FDA this week approved a software program to be used as an adjunctive aid for radiologists interpreting CT scans of the chest. ImageChecker CT uses computer-aided detection software to analyze CT images and highlight areas that appear to be solid nodules.
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Unified standards for radiology training gain favor in Europe

The concept of a radiology diploma that recognizes unified standards of training across Europe is slowly gaining ground. While radiologists continue to debate the pros and cons of such a diploma, the European Association of Radiology has completed a draft agreement on a European self-assessment program.
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Yearly mammograms prove insufficient for BRCA carriers

The danger of cancer developing in the interval between annual mammograms is prompting researchers to call for more frequent screening of women with BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 genetic mutations.
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Clinicians prefer structured, multimedia-enhanced reports

Physicians from a variety of specialties show a strong preference for structured radiology reports that are enhanced with embedded images, according to a study presented at the Society for Computer Applications in Radiology meeting in May.
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MR trumps mammography in detecting extent of cancer

MR imaging is more than twice as effective as mammography in detecting the number and extent of breast cancer tumors, according to a study presented by the International Breast MRI Consortium at the American Society for Clinical Oncology meeting in June.
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CT images track penetrating torso trauma

Triple-contrast CT can image the full extent of internal injury due to gunshot and stab wounds, according to a study conducted at the Maryland Shock-Trauma Center and reported in the June issue of Radiology.
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Perfusion CT shows way around cerebrovascular road blocks

The view of cerebral blood flow provided by perfusion CT during a balloon occlusion test can tell physicians whether patients are healthy enough to undergo permanent carotid occlusion, according to a study published in the June issue of Radiology.
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'Expert' witness gets booted from ACR

For the first time in its history, the American College of Radiology has expelled a member for giving inaccurate expert testimony.
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Newborns breathe easy in customized MR incubator

One size does not fit all when it comes to imaging newborns. Customized MR-compatible incubators with integrated head and body radio-frequency coils designed for neonates proved to be safe and provided higher quality images than standard imaging equipment, according to a study published in the May issue of Radiology.
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PET data redirect lung tumor therapy planning

Physicians targeting lung tumors can substantially improve their aim by adding PET imaging data to CT scans, according to a study published in the April 15 issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics.
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Wait till you see the tongs

Always ready to advance innovation, Siemens Medical Systems' CT division hit a new level of cool with its ice sculpture CT scanner, shown at a customer appreciation event during the Stanford International Symposium on Multidetector-Row CT. The frozen gantry lacked the mobility of the Siemens new subsecond-rotation 64-slice scanner, but it was a big hit with event attendees. A pair of glitter-clad models skated through the event, which was held at a San Francisco facility famed for exhibits that demonstrate principles in physics.
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Cardiac scans go to heart of Siemens 64-slice strategy

Emergency heart scans for chest pain represent a key application for a 64-slice CT scanner that Siemens Medical Solutions will soon bring to the U.S.
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Report from AIUM: Prenatal ultrasound diagnosis averts fetal deaths from vasa previa

Vasa previa, a condition affecting approximately one in 2500 pregnancies, is almost always lethal. Adding vasa previa screening to current obstetrical ultrasound protocols could prevent mortality, according to a study presented Tuesday at the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine meeting.
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CT showdown brings audience to edge of their seats

Stanford's International Symposium on Multidetector-Row CT continues to grow. Over four days in June, CT specialists from Stanford University and a handful of other U.S. and international sites brought about 700 radiologists up to date on the status of CT practice, research, and technology.
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Use of imaging grows in prostate cancer diagnosis and therapy

Management of prostate cancer relies heavily on appropriate use of imaging. Rather than competing with urologists, radiologists play a complementary role in detecting and diagnosing prostate cancer and also in staging, therapy, and follow-up, according to speakers at the European Congress of Radiology in March.
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Report from AIUM: 3D ultrasound may help parents bond with fetus

Although 3D ultrasound's role in fetal imaging remains a matter of controversy, everybody -- from undergrads to expert sonologists -- seems to agree on one point: It will positively influence parents bond with their fetuses, according to studies presented at the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine meeting.
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Preliminary data knock CT lung cancer screening

Researchers lacking primary mortality data from any of the CT lung cancer screening trials in progress have turned to modeling to determine if such screening saves lives. Their predictions do not bode well for CT screening.
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Report from SNM: Early experience with CV PET-CT meets expectations

Cardiovascular PET/CT vendors have touted hybrid imaging as the best of both diagnostic worlds. The first studies of hybrids' performance in clinical practice were presented Tuesday at the 2004 Society of Nuclear Medicine meeting. They suggest that hybrids are performing up to their users' high expectations.
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Report from SNM: PET with C-11 choline shows versatility in prostate cancer

PET using carbon-11 choline is known to be more sensitive than FDG-PET for imaging the prostate. Research has focused on finding which specific applications use the tracer best.
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Report from SNM: Image of the Year addresses personalized healthcare

Society of Nuclear Medicine senior lecturer Dr. Henry Wagner has a vision of a personalized healthcare system in which digital memory chips play a central role in image-based diagnosis and treatment. The 2004 nuclear medicine Image of the Year reflects this vision.
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Report from AIUM: 4D ultrasound aids fetal heart evaluation

Congenital heart defects account for approximately 44% of the total number of fetal abnormalities. A new 3D ultrasound-based visualization technique may help diagnose these defects in real-time, according to a study presented Monday at the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine meeting in Phoenix.
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Report from AIUM: 3D ultrasound matches MR and scintigraphy in diagnosis of pediatric hydronephrosis

Three-D ultrasound can accurately diagnose hydronephrosis in infants and children, according to a study presented Monday at the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine meeting.
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Report from AIUM: Ultrasound and hormonal marker help diagnose ectopic pregnancies

Ultrasound-based techniques in combination with a hormonal index marker can either confirm or rule out ectopic pregnancies, according to several papers presented Monday at the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine meeting in Phoenix.
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Report from SNM: PET/CT comes to the aid of diabetic patients with problem feet

PET/CT may offer diabetic patients prone to foot infection an extra margin of safety against osteomyelitis.
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Report from SNM: Modified technetium-sestamibi formula improves quality of dual-phase parathyroid scintigraphy

Dr. Maroun Karam is setting the record straight on the optimal radiopharmaceutical formulation for dual-phase technetium-99m sestamibi parathyroid scintigraphy. Karam presented a study at the SNM meeting Sunday that strongly suggests that U.S. nuclear physicians have been using the wrong formulation for more than a decade.
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Report from SNM: FLT-PET refines role in breast cancer

PET's place in breast cancer imaging is becoming clearer, based on various tracer kinetics. FLT-PET is not sensitive in early breast cancer, but it has value in determining response to therapy, according to studies presented Sunday at the Society of Nuclear Medicine meeting.
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Report from SNM: PET, SPECT help characterize dementias

Researchers wielding an increasing array of radiolabeled ligands are continually trying to better differentiate between various types of dementia. Two studies presented Monday at the Society of Nuclear Medicine meeting add to a growing repertoire.
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Report from SNM: Hybrid scanners outclass individual modalities for staging cancer

Comparative studies of PET/CT and SPECT/CT presented at Society of Nuclear Medicine meeting over the past three years have grown larger and more sophisticated, but they have produced the same results. Fusion imaging performed with specialized hybrid nuclear imaging equipment produces better staging studies than single modalities alone.
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Report from SNM: PET in small cell lung cancer gets needed attention

Far more research has been devoted to FDG-PET's impact on non-small cell lung cancer compared with small cell lung cancer. Research presented Sunday at the Society of Nuclear Medicine meeting promises to help balance the scales.
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Report from SNM: Imaging untangles mystery of drug-addicted brain

Nuclear medicine neuroimaging technology is at the forefront of the attempt to uncover the complex mechanisms involved in drug addiction, according to Dr. Nora D. Volkow, director of the National Institute of Drug Abuse. Volkow delivered the Henry Wagner lecture Sunday morning at the Society of Nuclear Medicine meeting.
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Report from ASNR: MR aids diagnosis and treatment of fetal head and neck masses

MR imaging may soon play a more prominent role in characterizing head or neck masses in the fetus, according to studies presented last week at the American Society of Neuroradiology meeting in Seattle. It could help in planning safe delivery and influencing case management.
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Report from ASNR: MR betters clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's by years

MR-tracked hippocampal volume changes can predict which patients with mild cognitive impairment are most likely to develop Alzheimer's disease years before a clinical assessment would do the same, according to a study presented last week at the American Society of Neuroradiology meeting in Seattle.
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CMS approves reimbursement for PET in Alzheimer's disease

The government's decision yesterday to allow Medicare reimbursement for PET imaging of suspected Alzheimer's patients comes after four years and many failed attempts by the nuclear medicine community to convince the agency of the technique's value in this patient population.
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PET spots hidden tumors heralded by neurological disorders

When other imaging alternatives strike out, FDG-PET can detect tumors so small that their only indication is a neurological syndrome, according to a study presented at the American Academy of Neurology meeting in May.
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Global imaging community faces urgency in AIDS epidemic

Developing countries urgently need educational materials about the imaging manifestations of AIDS. Speakers at the European Congress of Radiology in March warned that the global imaging community should not forget the millions of patients who die from the disease every year.
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ACR pans proposal to allow physician assistants to read mammography

The American College of Radiology has expressed opposition to Institute of Medicine recommendations suggesting that physician assistants can be trained to perform preliminary or double reading of screening mammography.
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IOM report urges use of physician extenders for preliminary mammography reads

The National Academies' Institute of Medicine has proposed training of physician assistants to provide preliminary and double reading of screening mammography. The IOM hopes to help reverse a decline in access to mammography services in the U.S.
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Imaging helps solve mystery of Eva Peron's death

Two Argentinean radiologists presented an electronic poster at the European Congress of Radiology in March that revealed for the first time how x-rays were used to determine the authenticity of Eva Peron's embalmed corpse.
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CAD helps radiologists pick up polyps

CT colonography exams are difficult and time-consuming to read and interpret, a potential barrier to more widespread colon cancer screening. Computer-aided detection has potential to make a dent in that barrier, according to University of Chicago researchers.
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AAA screening project shows encouraging results

The success of a small-scale scheme in the U.K. to detect asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysms is adding weight to calls for a national AAA screening program.
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MRI spots postprostatectomy recurrence

Endorectal coil MR imaging should join the diagnostic algorithm for patients suspected of local recurrence after prostatectomy, according to a Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center study.
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ACR splits hairs revising communication guidelines

Radiologists will not have to ?directly? communicate certain findings to referring physicians if a proposed change to the American College of Radiology communication practice guidelines takes effect next year.
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Microbes hitch a ride on doctors' neckties

Physicians wearing neckties who come in close contact with patients may be carrying around infectious microbes, according to research presented in New Orleans last month at the American Society for Microbiology meeting.
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CT guidance aids gene therapy for renal cell carcinoma

CT-guided injection offers an optimal way to deliver immunotherapeutic agents for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma, according to a study published in the May issue of Radiology.
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Eureka! fMRI discovers brain region responsible for insight

Many people have ?light bulb? moments. After they've been stymied by a problem, the solution suddenly hits them with a flash. This flash of insight is a real biological phenomenon, according to a study published online in the April Public Library of Science Biology.
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Compound ultrasound helps characterize carotid plaque

Real-time compound ultrasound imaging can aid in the assessment of carotid artery plaque morphology and may help estimate the risk for stroke, according to a study published in the April issue of Stroke.
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Report from ISMRM: PET/CT outperforms in whole body compared with MR

Despite playing before a partisan crowd at the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine meeting ast week in Kyoto, Japan, morphologic MR imaging was unable to surpass the inherent physiological properties of PET/CT in a head-to-head test to determine which is better for whole-body cancer staging.
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Web site examines benefits of medical imaging

Medical imaging tends to get more attention for raising healthcare costs than for improving healthcare quality. The National Electrical Manufacturers Association aims to balance that view with a Web site that focuses on the positive aspects of clinical imaging.
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RF ablation takes on breast cancer

Radio-frequency ablation safely treats small breast tumors and could eventually replace lumpectomy, according to a study published in the April issue of Radiology.
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Virtual colonoscopy wins reimbursement approval

A local HMO in Madison, WI, granted reimbursement this month for virtual colonoscopy screening. The insurer was persuaded by a two-year multicenter screening study conducted by Dr. Perry J. Pickhardt and published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2003.
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Report from SCAR: Digital mammography research adds contrast subtraction

Digital mammography provides a springboard from which new imaging techniques are developed to address current limitations in the detection and diagnosis of breast cancer.
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Report from SCAR: PDAs in radiology lag behind use in other medical specialties

Although radiology has in many respects led the digital revolution in medicine, it lags behind other medical specialties in the use of personal digital assistants as a medical tool, presenters said at a SCAR session Thursday.
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ACR censures radiologist for expert testimony

The American College of Radiology's Committee on Ethics has censured a radiologist for violating ethical standards regarding expert medical testimony.
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Report from ISMRM: MR spectroscopy predicts whether schizophrenic patients will recover

University of Melbourne researchers in Australia have made progress towards perfecting a technique that uses proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to predict the recovery of newly admitted schizophrenia patients.
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MR blood flow imaging rivals x-ray angiography

A novel MR imaging technique can capture moving images of blood traveling through the vessels without the use of contrast material. It could challenge x-ray angiography, according to researchers at Duke University Medical Center.
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Report from ISMRM: Screening MRM makes a difference for genetically susceptible women

A six-year study at the University of Bonn suggests that MR mammography should be adopted as a front-line screening test for breast cancer for women who have a genetic predisposition to develop the disease.
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Radiology departments mothball ?help wanted' signs

Overworked radiologists may be taking a breather from their crushing workloads. The severe staffing shortage that has plagued the industry in recent years is abating, according to a study conducted by the American College of Radiology.
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Report from ISMRM: Breast MR performs well in test of clinical relevance

Breast MR imaging has proved its clinical worth, according to Dr. Sasha I. Usiskin, a radiology researcher at University College, London, who presented findings at the 2004 ISMRM meeting in Kyoto, Japan, on Tuesday.
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CE-MRI reliably differentiates pediatric bowel disease

Gadolinium-based MR imaging shows high sensitivity and specificity in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease diagnosis. It can reliably differentiate between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins University.
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Report from ISMRM: Dynamic contrast MR finds use in tyrosine kinase inhibitor trial

In a pioneering application of MR imaging as a measure of therapeutic response, researchers are using the results of a multicenter dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging study to justify the advancement of a tyrosine kinase inhibitor to phase II clinical trials. The results were announced Monday at the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine conference in Kyoto, Japan.
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Immediate screening results decrease breast cancer worries

Imaging centers committed to reducing patient stress caused by false-positive mammogram results should focus on immediate report turnaround rather than on educational intervention, according to a recent study at Harvard Pilgrim Health Care and Harvard Medical School.
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Success fuels success for radiology research programs

If you want to play with the big dogs, you first need a yard. That's the rule in radiology research, according to three department chairs who shared their insights on the process at the Association of University Radiologists meeting in San Francisco in April.
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San Francisco RT dies following sickout protest and discipline threat

Labor unrest among radiologic technologists at San Francisco General Hospital garnered national attention when a key union representative apparently committed suicide after an especially heated round of negotiations.
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MR highlights diabetes risk factor for Alzheimer's disease

MR imaging shows that diabetic patients face a high likelihood of developing cortical atrophy, according to an international multicenter study published in the March issue of Diabetes.
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Report from AOCR: AOSR woos wider audience with future congress plans

The Asian Oceanian Society of Radiology is stepping back from its short-lived trial of Singapore as a permanent meeting venue and hosting its next congress in Hong Kong in 2006.
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ACR reverses plan for extremity-only MR accreditation

The American College of Radiology has retreated from its plan to accredit extremity-only MR imaging facilities operated by nonradiologists. College officials will focus their attention instead on closing a loophole in the Stark rules that govern self-referral, according to officials at the ACR annual meeting in Washington, DC.
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Report from ARRS: Ambiguous findings drive breast MR referrals

A study of referrals for breast MR imaging shows clinicians as well as radiologists rely on the technique primarily to clear up ambiguous findings on other imaging tests and physical examinations, according to research presented Thursday at the American Roentgen Ray Society meeting in Miami Beach.
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Report from ARRS: Contrast-enhanced MR bests PET in detecting small GI liver mets

Dual contrast-enhanced MR imaging offers superior detection of small liver metastases in patients with gastrointestinal cancer as compared with FDG-PET, according to research presented Wednesday at the American Roentgen Ray Association meeting in Miami Beach.
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Report from ARRS: CAD increases breast cancer detection, recall rates

Routine use of computer-aided detection in screening mammography boosts cancer detection rates and is equivalent to double reading, according to preliminary results from a prospective study presented at the American Roentgen Ray Society meeting in Miami Beach.
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Report from ARRS: Trauma CT scans do double duty in assessing spine injuries

Two new studies strengthen the case for relying solely on multidetector CT scans of the abdomen and pelvis to evaluate spine injuries, eliminating the need for plain-film x-ray and dedicated lumbar CT studies, according to research presented Tuesday at the American Roentgen Ray Society meeting in Miami Beach.
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Report from AOCR: Liver lesions respond to combination treatment

Nonsurgical strategies for treating liver lesions show promising results, but minimally invasive therapy has yet to realize its potential in tackling hepatocellular carcinoma. Future treatment for this patient population may involve a combination of interventional techniques, according to speakers at the Asian Oceanian Congress of Radiology in Singapore last month.
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Report from ARRS: CT tops DSA in arterial injury assessment

With its lower risk and increased speed, multidetector CT angiography has displaced traditional digital subtraction angiography as the initial exam in patients with suspected arterial injury at Boston University Medical Center, according to a paper presented Tuesday at the American Roentgen Ray Society meeting in Miami Beach.
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News from AOCR: MR screening triggers lively debate

Walk-in CT clinics may be closing their doors, but the concept of consumer-led preventive imaging is far from dead. Interest is switching to MR imaging as a screening tool to reassure the worried well and highlight dormant disease.
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Ultrasound screening helps adults with sickle cell disease

Doppler echocardiography screening in adults with sickle cell disease may help detect pulmonary hypertension before it becomes fatal, according to a study published in the Feb. 26 issue New England Journal of Medicine.
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Report from AOCR: Lower limb PTA keeps chronic ischemia patients mobile

Long-term diabetic patients presenting with foot ulcers or necrosis can avoid amputation by undergoing percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and drug therapy within 48 hours of assessment, according to research presented at the 10th Asian Oceanian Congress of Radiology meeting in Singapore.
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News from AOCR: SARS reports coincide with new outbreak fears

The 10th Asian Oceanian Congress of Radiology finally opened Thursday in Singapore with a timely reminder of events that forced its lengthy postponement.
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Mood disorders hinder methamphetamine abuse treatment

PET scans may have detected a reason methamphetamine therapy works for some users and not others: depression and anxiety developed during initial abstinence. Physicians treating the addiction can improve their results by also treating attendant mood disorders, according to researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles Neuropsychiatric Institute.
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Combined MR imaging techniques home in on breast cancer

In breast cancer detection, combining different MR imaging techniques produces more than the sum of the parts, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
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Groups carve out duties for ACR-endorsed supertech

A survey has apparently found wide support for delegating a lengthy list of procedures traditionally performed by radiologists to a new class of practitioners called radiologist assistants.
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Carotid stent moves closer to FDA approval

An advisory panel voted Wednesday by a narrow margin to recommend that the FDA approve a carotid stent system and embolic protection device. The FDA gave no indication when it would make its final decision.
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ACR primer outlines response to radiological terrorism

You won't find it on The New York Times bestseller list, but a disaster preparedness primer from the American College of Radiology is one of the hottest tickets on the Internet.
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Austria runs afoul of radiation safety directive

European Commission officials have issued a final warning for Austria to tighten up its radiation protection laws or face court action.
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Ignoring breast CAD findings need not breach standard of care

Failure to act on computer-aided detection breast markings in areas judged to be benign or normal by experienced radiologists does not constitute a breach in the standard of care, according to a study in the March issue of Radiology.
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Diffusion-weighted MR successfully monitors carotid stenting

Early ischemic changes in patients who have undergone carotid angioplasty and stent placement with protective devices can be pinpointed with diffusion-weighted MR imaging. DWI should be used for these patients rather than conventional MRI, ultrasound, or neurologic exams, according to Italian researchers.
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Metal detector promises increased safety in MR suites

Automatic scanning technology may help screen ferromagnetic objects, but common sense has no substitute
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Gastroenterologists spark controversy, slam the brakes on virtual colonoscopy

Despite increasing use, CT colonography, or virtual colonoscopy, is not yet ready for primetime, according to researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina. Their results contrast sharply with another recent study citing equal or better results than optical colonoscopy. The MUSC study indicates that virtual colonoscopy is significantly less sensitive than conventional colonoscopy.
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New PET tracer may aid Alzheimer's diagnosis

A novel PET tracer has shown promise in locating amyloid plaques, which may help in the early diagnosis of patients with Alzheimer's disease, according to a study in the January Annals of Neurology.
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MDCT distinguishes active Crohn's disease from chronic condition

Multidetector CT enterography can not only assess Crohn's disease and its activity. It can also identify whether patients are suffering from active or chronic variations of the condition, University of Michigan researchers reported at the 2003 RSNA meeting.
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Stents approach standard of care status for occlusive leg arteries

Stent placement as treatment for lower extremity ischemia should be considered the standard of care, according to a study conducted at Brown University Medical School.
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MR reliably gauges Alzheimer's disease progression

Adding MR imaging measurements of brain atrophy rates to the standard clinical evaluation bolsters the accuracy of disease progression assessment in patients with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease, according to a study from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN.
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fMRI proves conquering pain can be mind over gray matter

The expectation of pain relief is enough to induce changes in the brain's pain pathways, according to a pair of studies by researchers at the Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs Health Care System. Both studies appeared in the February issue of Science.
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All-digital Olympic facility adds option for remote reads

Accurate assessment of sports injuries can prove vital when medals or world records are at stake, and competitors at this summer's Olympic Games in Athens will have ready access to first-class medical imaging services.
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Improper room luminance may hinder interpretation

High ambient room light can degrade image contrast and may even lead to clinical misinterpretation, according to a recent FDA study.
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Ultrasound matches CT in detecting hepatic abscesses

Using a low mechanical index technique and ultrasound contrast, Italian researchers have diagnosed liver abscesses caused by pyogenic organisms.
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Precocious readers show hyperactivity in temporal cortex

Before they ever utter a word, some children demonstrate reading ability far beyond their age level. Diagnosed with hyperlexia, these "precocious" readers display hyperactivation of the left superior temporal cortex. They represent the opposite end of the spectrum from dyslexics, who show hypoactivation of the same area of the brain.
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Contrast-enhanced ultrasound aids peripheral arterial obstructive disease diagnosis

Contrast-enhanced duplex ultrasound improves preoperative assessment of the crural arteries and may reduce the need for angiography, according to Dutch researchers. They published their findings in the March issue of the Journal of Vascular Surgery.
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Foot dominance points to adolescent MSK condition

Unilateral enlarged ischiopubic synchondrosis, which affects growing children when their pubic and ischial bones fuse, is closely correlated with their foot dominance, according to a study in the February issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.
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Ultrasound competes well in diagnosing wrist cartilage tears

High-resolution ultrasound can be a fast, cost-effective alternative to MR and arthrography in diagnosing fibrocartilage tears in the wrists, according to a study from Canada published in the February issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.
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Report from AMI: Investigational PET imaging agents pinpoint brain cancer

Two PET radiopharmaceutical agents may have what it takes to reliably detect brain tumors and monitor their physiology, according to researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles.
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Report from AMI: Adding PET to CT improves measurement of response to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma therapy

The accepted standard for evaluating non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients' response to chemotherapy may soon change. PET plus CT is superior to CT alone for predicting patient survival, according to a University of Iowa study.
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Report from SIR: Cataracts present greater threat to IRs than previously thought

A special imaging system has found that interventional radiologists are at an increased risk of developing posterior subcapsular damage, a starting point for cataracts, according to research presented at the Society of Interventional Radiology meeting in Phoenix.
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Report from SIR: New ultrasound display makes body translucent

A new handheld ultrasound device merges the patient, image, instrument, and operator's hands into the same field-of-view without using a head-mounted display.
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Report from SIR: TIPS helps patients with rare disease

Untreated Budd-Chiari syndrome progresses to necrosis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis, necessitating liver transplantation. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts my be the answer for early intervention in the disease, according to two studies presented Sunday at the Society of Interventional Radiology meeting in Phoenix.
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Report from AMI: Molecular imaging takes on crucial role in conquering cancer

Molecular imaging is at the core of the National Cancer Institute's plan to eliminate human suffering and death associated with cancer by 2015, said the director of the institute at the annual meeting of the Academy of Molecular Imaging.
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Report from SIR: Interventional radiology adds revenue to diagnostic imaging

A dedicated interventional radiology practice within a diagnostic imaging practice brings in patients and revenue, according to two studies presented at the Society of Interventional Radiology meeting Saturday in Phoenix.
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Report from SIR: Diabetics fare well in carotid stenting trial

High-risk diabetic patients who underwent carotid stenting had far fewer heart attacks and significantly fewer major adverse events at one-year follow-up than those who underwent carotid endarterectomy to prevent stroke, according to data presented Friday at the Society of Interventional Radiology meeting in Phoenix.
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Report from SIR: New IR practice model emerges

Until now, interventional radiology practice has come in two models: one within diagnostic radiology groups, the other within vascular surgery or interventional cardiology groups.
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Dutch researchers dismiss HRT link to breast density

Women presenting for breast screening in the Netherlands are increasingly likely to have dense breast tissue, which has an impact on cancer detection. But the suspected culprit, hormone replacement therapy, is off the hook.
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Breast society's expert witness guidelines address controversy

The question of qualifications for radiologists who testify as expert witnesses in malpractice cases has fueled an ongoing debate. The Society of Breast Imaging has entered the fray by publishing a set of guidelines it suggests are minimal qualifications for an expert testifying in court.
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Report about SIR: Meeting touts minimally invasive therapy, practice building

Interventional radiology's role in fueling technological advances in minimally invasive image-guided therapy may be the best-kept secret in the mainstream press. The Society of Interventional Radiology meeting could change that dynamic, as researchers showcase data that demonstrate interventional success in everything from stroke to varicose veins.
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Report about SIR: Meeting expands its exhibitors, new product showcase

The annual meeting of the Society of Interventional Radiology promises to be 10% larger than last year's meeting, including a number of new exhibitors and over 40 products in the new product showcase.
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MDCT boosts pancreatic cancer staging

Multidetector CT can spot vascular invasion and identify resectable tumors in patients diagnosed with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, according to a study published in the February issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.
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Special MDCT viewer offers better image grouping and sorting

A new viewer developed at Fujita Health University in Japan promises to streamline the process of reviewing images produced by multidetector CT scanners.
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Radiology shows growing appeal for residency applicants

Interest in radiology is running at an all-time high among medical school seniors, according to the National Resident Matching Program's annual report, released March 18. But the good news is offset by a continuing decline in the number of positions available.
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Medical x-ray burden prompts call for regulation

Unless stricter regulation and penalties are enforced, patients will continue to receive unnecessary exposure to ionizing radiation, according to a senior medical researcher from Italy.
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New system boosts mammographic accuracy

An automated system that correlates histologic and mammographic results could refine radiologists' ability to detect breast cancer, according to a multicenter study published in the February issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.
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Insurance companies fuel RFA boom

An increasing number of insurance carriers are providing reimbursement for radio-frequency ablation of unresectable liver lesions. The move may spark an explosion in RFA-related procedures.
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Malpractice database comes under fire

An online database created by a radiologist that tracks malpractice patients, their attorneys, and expert witnesses has shut down just days after receiving national attention.
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Report from ECR: Diffusion tensor imaging can be used to indirectly assess brain microstructure

Diffusion tensor imaging is a relative newcomer in MR imaging. The ability to measure the molecular movement of water within cellular structures was first described less than 20 years ago.
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Report from ECR: Questions linger over clinical value of breast CAD

Computer-aided detection software may help radiologists spot more cancers, but CAD's clinical potential remains limited by its high false-positive rates.
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Report from ECR: Stent-grafts offer alternative to surgery for AAA ruptures

If patients are hemodynamically stable, ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms can be treated with stent grafting rather than surgical repair, Italian and Swiss researchers reported Monday. With about 100 cases reported in two unrelated studies, the procedure appears safe with a low complication rate.
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Report from ACC: MR may help screen risk of sudden cardiac death

Cardiac MR offers promise as a screening aid for patients who present with chest pain or may be at risk of sudden death, according to two studies reported at the American College of Cardiology meeting in New Orleans.
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Report from ECR: MRS adds specificity to breast MRI

MR spectroscopy can improve specificity in breast cancer detection without losing sensitivity. And the acquisition and postprocessing of spectroscopic data are sufficiently user-friendly to become routine in a clinical setting, according to research presented Tuesday at the ECR.
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Report from ECR: DSA may lose gold standard status in stenotic lower limb analysis

Digital subtraction angiography was unable to visualize nearly 10% of 1127 arterial segments analyzed by researchers in the U.K. Because four-slice CT angiography picked up all those missed stenoses, DSA should not be considered the gold standard in this patient population, they said.
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Report from ECR: 16-row CT reduces need for coronary angiography

Radiologists are still exploring the full potential of CT in the coronary arteries. Dutch researchers suggest it may be able to replace conventional angiography in some patients by dictating appropriate treatment without additional invasive imaging, according to a presentation Friday afternoon at the European Congress of Radiology.
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CT redirects treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer

CT can determine the presence and extent of recurrent ovarian cancer and indicate potential nonresectable areas. Its findings can influence patient management, according to a study published in the February issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.
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CTA helps determine success of AAA repair

CT angiography holds advantages over MR angiography in helping to stratify patients suitable for endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Three-D image reconstruction is crucial for accurate assessment of lengths of tortuous vessel segments, according to a report presented at the International Symposium on Endovascular Therapy in January.
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Free software may enable teleradiology in any PACS

PACS administrators can now install into their workstations freely available software that allows remote users to view PACS desktop environments from anywhere on the Internet. The software allows even institutions with slow networks to bypass installing PACS client software into each remote location and transferring large DICOM files over those networks.
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Globetrotting radiologist tackles hemorrhagic telangiectasia

For researchers confronting some rare, unusual diagnoses, building a case library could be the work of a lifetime. With electronic links to colleagues around the world and the ability to store images and information digitally for remote viewers, experts can share their findings more quickly than ever.
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Tennessee radiologists suffer blow from state Supreme Court

The Tennessee Supreme Court handed down an unfavorable decision to radiologists on Feb. 20, essentially stripping them of their right to a fair hearing following a hospital's decision to contract with another radiology group.
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Teleradiology softens high volume, coverage demands

A persistent labor shortage in the face of growing demand for imaging is forcing radiologists to reassess needs, resources, and even policies. Teleradiology increasingly presents the solution to these problems.
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3D CTA stratifies kidney transplant donors

Not long ago, prospective kidney donors underwent lengthy, potentially hazardous studies for preoperative evaluation. Today, 3D image reconstruction with CT is fast changing that paradigm, according to a study published in the January issue of The Journal of Urology.
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'Manhattan Project' emphasizes cardiac CT, MR training

A handful of radiologists are spearheading a drive to ensure that the specialty does not lose cardiac CT and MR imaging, the way it let nuclear and echocardiology slip away. It is dubbed the "Manhattan Project" to highlight time pressure, level of importance, and need for a concentrated effort to deliver results.
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Negative pulmonary CTA predicts future PE risk

Negative multidetector CT angiography findings predict a low risk of future emboli in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism. They also help clinicians reconsider management choices for these patients, according to a study published in the February issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.
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Report from SCMR: CE MRI rules out risk of sudden death from ventricular tachyarrhythmia

Contrast-enhanced MR myocardial perfusion imaging is known to be a powerful test for detecting infarction and predicting the potential success of revascularization after an ischemic event. Researchers are finding it may also help predict the risk of sudden death for patients with ventricular tachyarrhythmia.
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MR links depression with biology

Canadian neurobiologists studying depression have found that young adults in the early stages of the disorder exhibit smaller hippocampal volumes than their healthy counterparts. They hope finding the biological link between brain anatomy and disease eases the stigma surrounding depression.
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Ohio physicians fight back on frivolous lawsuits

The Ohio State Medical Association has formed the Frivolous Lawsuit Committee to help physicians recover money spent defending lawsuits that are without merit. The movement also serves to put lawyers on notice that physicians are ready to fight back.
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Report from SCMR: Combined cardiac MR exam outshines TIMI

A comprehensive cardiac MR exam may be the noninvasive answer to determining whether a subset of patients needs to be referred for cardiac catheterization, according to research presented last week at the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance annual meeting in Barcelona.
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Report from SCMR: Study tests qualitative approach to cardiac MR myocardial examination

In the hands of academic radiologists, cardiac MR may be a proven tool for diagnosing myocardial infarction. But its performance and practicality in a community practice have not been closely studied.
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Feds fail to stop fMRI marketing studies

The U.S. Office for Human Research Protections has indicated that functional MRI studies used to help companies develop marketing strategies do not violate federal regulations. The studies are being conducted at Emory University.
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U.K. study quantifies plain film, CT cancer risk

U.K. researchers have produced the most detailed figures to date on the likely risk of cancer from exposre to diagnostic x-rays. But while their message of judicious radiation use may be sound, their assumptions may have led to an overestimation of the risk.
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Communication emphasis churns up lexicon polemics

Communication for better patient care, the theme of the 2003 RSNA meeting, begins with the radiology report. Yet this ubiquitous communiqué receives little scientific attention.
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Standardized MR protocol helps diagnose, follow MS

MR has emerged as the imaging modality of choice to diagnose and follow patients with multiple sclerosis. Yet no formal standards have existed for its use in clinical practice, until now.
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Incidental PET findings may lead to undetected cancer

PET is not only a powerhouse modality for detecting primary cancers. It also shows promise in uncovering abnormalities unrelated to the original malignancies, according to a study in the February issue of Radiology.
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Focused ultrasound releases antitumor activity

High-intensity focused ultrasound not only treats various types of solid carcinomas, it also eliminates metastases not originally targeted, according to researchers in China. And it avoids the side effects of radiotherapy.
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Dual-modality interventional imaging directs chemotherapy

Intraprocedural MR and C-arm angiography have been used to safely treat patients with inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma with a magnetic targeted carrier bound to a chemotherapy agent, according to a study from the University of California, San Francisco.
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Sharps violations move into national spotlight

Interventional radiologists will face closer scrutiny as a national campaign focused on the prevention of sharps injuries takes shape. The campaign targets teaching hospitals, where medical interns and residents face an increased risk of accidental needlesticks.
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Low-field MR guides lesion biopsy

MR-guided biopsies of retroperitoneal or para-aortic lesions using an open low-field system can be performed safely and precisely with sufficient visualization of the lesions and the aorta, according to a German report at the 2003 RSNA meeting.
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ACR, ARRS merger talks go on hold

Two heavyweight radiology societies that revealed just last week that they were considering merging operations today announced that those efforts have been put on hold.
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Ultrasound can reveal identical twin pregnancies

Ability to predict complications during pregnancy depends partly on knowing early whether a woman is carrying identical twins. Ultrasound can produce and refine that knowledge, according to Australian researchers.
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Microchip avoids need for repeat CT in AAA patients

A wireless microchip may soon allow doctors to detect endoleaks by remotely monitoring pressure inside a repaired abdominal aortic aneurysm.
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Inventors face tough questions from experts on new products

A panel of "who's who in endovascular entrepreneurship" grilled neophyte inventors in a first-time innovators' forum held at the 16th Annual International Symposium on Endovascular Therapy in Miami.
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ACR, ARRS explore merger opportunities

Leaders of the American College of Radiology and the American Roentgen Ray Society have been holding high-level talks, apparently to explore the possibility of merging operations.
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AAA screening remains rare, even though treatment saves lives

Abdominal aortic aneurysms are relatively easy to detect using ultrasound and CT, but screening for the condition is rarely done in the U.S. Often no obvious symptoms give warning prior to rupture to prompt someone with AAA to seek medical attention.
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A dinosaur contemplates his own extinction

Delivering the Charles J. Tegtmeyer Lecture at the 16th Annual International Symposium on Endovascular Therapy in Miami on Tuesday, Dr. Gordon McLean made three proclamations:
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Carotid MRA and CTA complement each other

MR angiography and CT angiography have largely replaced most invasive diagnostic angiography procedures to evaluate carotid artery disease. Each modality has strengths and weaknesses, and radiologists should acquaint themselves with these distinctions.
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Live conference demonstrations have their risks

The audience was riveted by a live case demonstration of an internal carotid artery stenting during the 16th Annual International Symposium on Endovascular Therapy in Miami on Monday. Then all hell broke loose.
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Antibody-coated stents attract endothelial cells

Trials have consistently shown that drug-eluting stents prevent restenosis better than bare mental stents. Researchers are now focusing on prosthetic and vascular devices coated with antibodies, which exploit the body's natural healing processes.
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Delayed mammography results do not cause undue worry

Contrary to expectations, women don't become more anxious when they learn that their mammography results will be delayed. Relaxations techniques also failed to affect anxiety levels.
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Florida fraud crackdown targets MRI, leads to a host of new regulations

Florida clinics and MRI centers face a host of new licensure and accreditation requirements on March 1 under a new law aimed at controlling fraud in personal injury claims.
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Even low radiation doses in infants may reduce future cognitive function

Small amounts of radiation, equivalent to the doses used in CT scans of the skull, could adversely affect an infant's intellectual capacity in adulthood, according to a new study.
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Drug-eluting stents show promise for periphery

Drug-eluting stents offer a potentially effective means of preventing restenosis in peripheral superficial femoral artery disease, although more clinical studies are needed, according to a group of German radiologists.
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MR shows that more isn't necessarily better in ADHD patients

Armed with MR brain mapping techniques, researchers have found that children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder have too much gray matter in their temporal lobes. They note in a study published in the November 2003 issue of The Lancet that the increased amount of gray matter could complicate normal brain functions.
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Dispute over clavicle scans affects asylum-seekers

A Dutch court has overruled the opinions of two of the Netherlands' leading pediatric radiologists and authorized continued use of a controversial technique that uses x-rays of the clavicle to determine the age of young immigrants.
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Opposition party in U.K. scores antiquated imaging equipment

It may just be partisan politics as usual, but bickering among the political parties in the U.K. has resulted in accusations that the country's imaging equipment is not up to snuff. A report published by the Liberal Democrats found that much of the imaging equipment used in the National Health System has passed its prime.
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CT gives capsule endoscopy a boost

Capsule endoscopy, the "camera pill" introduced several years ago, continues to show promise in the diagnosis of small-bowel disease. One caveat, however, is its inability to localize the abnormalities. CT may be the perfect complement to pair it up with, according to researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, AZ.
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HIPAA-compliant PACS solution debuts

Clinical data security has become a vital issue in the wake of the April 2003 HIPAA mandate. This requires healthcare entities to provide privacy and security assurance of data managed by PACS along with other clinical information.
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MR predicts future memory decline

MR imaging charts volume changes in the medial temporal lobe that correlate with memory decline, according to researchers from New York University School of Medicine.
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MR helps spine trauma prognosis in the ER

Emergency room MR can predict whether motor impairment after traumatic injury of the cervical spine will be temporary or permanent, according to research presented at the 2003 RSNA meeting.
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New worries dominate medical landscape

The focus on malpractice among physicians in general, and radiologists in particular, is so pervasive that it's hard to believe it was ever any other way. But recent surveys by Merritt, Hawkins & Associates tell a different story.
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Injection rates affect MR breast imaging

Signal intensity time curves, which describe the dynamic pattern of MR contrast enhancement, are significantly affected by the speed of contrast injection, according to researchers at the University of California, San Francisco.
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MR imaging could spare women unnecessary breast surgery

The conventional practice of performing reexcision in all patients following surgical excision of a primary breast cancer may need another look, according to University of Chicago researchers. MR imaging after the initial surgery may provide enough information to eliminate surgical follow-up procedures.
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Plain-film studies bleed money in outpatient setting

That sucking noise emanating from the radiography suite may be the sound of money draining from the practice. Brown University radiologists estimate that they lose an average of nearly $25 every time their outpatient centers perform a plain-film study.
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Theoretical advantages of stent clash with reality

The Biliary Wallstent from Boston Scientific has been used for a decade for palliation of malignant obstructive jaundice. Now, the newer Luminexx from German vendor Angiomed offers several theoretical advantages. But researchers in the U.K. have found that those advantages fail to hold up under scrutiny.
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Radiology residents lack sufficient training for screening mammography

University of Chicago researchers wanted to see how well radiology residents were really trained to read mammograms. Not too well, they concluded.
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MR takes a swing at golf-related hip injuries

Golf, especially as played by elite athletes, can produce hip lesions including labral, capsular, and ligament injuries. MR imaging shows promise in diagnosing such injuries, according to Pennsylvania researchers.
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Postmortem imaging gains wider acceptance in autopsy cases

A multidisciplinary research team from the University of Berne in Switzerland is using CT and MR to conduct virtual autopsies.
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Knowing serum levels improves success of biliary stenting

Although percutaneous stenting of biliary obstruction is an established palliative method, some patients have a poorer prognosis than others. Researchers in the U.K. determined that this subset of patients generally has higher bilirubin and creatinine levels, and lower albumin. Metastases were not a predictor of early mortality.
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MR images invasive lobular cancer better than mammography

Compared with conventional imaging, contrast-enhanced MR provides a more accurate assessment of the extent of invasive lobular carcinoma in the breast, according to researchers in Canada.
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Diagnostic Imaging article figures in medical malpractice case

An opinion column that appeared in the August edition of Diagnostic Imaging has emerged as a factor in a medical malpractice case in Florida. Plaintiffs in the case are accusing the defense of witness intimidation after a copy of the article was mailed to an expert witness for the plaintiffs.
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Ultrasound aids diagnosis, management of testicular tumors

While the clinical literature shows most palpable tumors of the testes carry a strong chance of malignancy, discrepancies still exist regarding impalpable ones. Ultrasound could help in the diagnosis and management of impalpable lesions, according to Italian researchers.
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FLT bests FDG in imaging lung tumor proliferation

One of the first government-approved indications for FDG-PET was detection of non-small cell lung cancer. While FDG-PET still reigns supreme in that effort, a new tracer is finding success in determining the extent of tumor cell proliferation.
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Race affects breast cancer incidence, mortality

While breast cancer incidence rates over the past decade have increased in white women and stabilized in African American women, a dramatic disparity persists in death rates between the two groups.
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Tool could teach radiologists volumes

A software tool that allows a probe-based exploration of CT and MR volume data sets could become a learning tool for radiologists who are beginning to interpret 3D images, according to its developers.
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Tool could teach radiologists volumes

A software tool that allows a probe-based exploration of CT and MR volume data sets could become a learning tool for radiologists who are beginning to interpret 3D images, according to its developers.
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Calcifications may presage invasive breast cancer

Although debate continues concerning the relevance of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) detection, calcifications associated with DCIS may foreshadow the presence of more invasive breast carcinomas, according to researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital.
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New standards help improve MDCT cardiac calcium tests

Radiologists and medical physicists are taking actions that promise to improve the accuracy, reproducibility, and radiation-related safety of coronary artery calcium tests performed with multidetector CT.
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Protocols contribute to good ER imaging decisions

Running the numbers on clinical and cost-effectiveness data may dampen the excitement of emergency room imaging. But simple, valid protocols for applying diagnostic imaging to trauma cases are essential to obtaining the greatest benefit from expensive CT technology, said Dr. C. Craig Blackmore and Dr. M.G. Myriam Hunink in lectures at the RSNA meeting.
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New crop of radiologists shines at RSNA meeting

More attendees at the 2003 RSNA meeting knew the difference between a refresher course and a categorical course. While total professional attendance stalled, first-time attendance rose, according to society officials.
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CE-CTA appears ready for routine internal carotid artery imaging

Taiwanese researchers have found that contrasted-enhanced multidetector CT angiography is a perfect match for conventional angiography in differentiating between total and near-total occlusive disease and mapping the architectural landmarks of the internal carotid artery (ICA)
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Virtual arthroscopy 'sees' meniscal tears

Multidetector CT-based virtual fly-throughs of the knee are now feasible, according to a paper presented at the RSNA meeting Thursday.
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Consumer whole-body CT screening begets more screening

They probably aren't fatal, or even dangerous, but numerous abnormalities lurk in the bodies of most adult Americans. Nearly 60% of patients who underwent self-referred full-body CT scanning have some sort of finding that leads to a recommendation for follow-up care.
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Simple strategies avert physician eye fatigue

The most important equipment that radiologists use -- their eyes -- is subjected to daily stresses and strains that can affect job performance. But eye strain is both prevalent and preventable, said Dr. Bruce Forster, an associate professor of radiology at the University of British Columbia, during a special focus session on workplace health issues at the RSNA meeting.
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Time, not expertise, dictates accurate CT colonography results

Radiologists who are most experienced at reading virtual colonoscopy studies may not deliver the most accurate results, according to a pilot study presented Monday at the RSNA meeting.
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RFA tops surgery for treatment of liver tumors

Defying conventional wisdom, Italian researchers are saying that radio-frequency ablation should be offered as first-line treatment for patients with liver tumors. They will present data to support this breakthrough at the upcoming RSNA meeting in Chicago.
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Noncontrast 3D-TOF MRA aids coil embolization

Three-D time-of-flight MR angiography has proved its value for carotid artery imaging and other neuroimaging studies. It can also be used to follow up patients with brain aneurysms who have undergone coil embolization, according to French researchers.
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RSNA breaks it all down for you

If you don't know the difference between a refresher course and a categorical course, you're not alone. And the RSNA communication office understands your frustration.
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Interventionalists seek confirmation of cataract threat

Interventional radiologists are well aware of the risks to their health that can result from radiation exposure during routine fluoroscopic procedures. But new research suggests that cataracts may be higher on their list of job hazards than previously suspected.
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MR displays drug's effects on Alzheimer's patients

MRI and MR spectroscopy have shown hippocampal improvement in patients with Alzheimer's disease who take donepezil, a drug commonly used for its treatment. This is the first study of its kind to use MR imaging techniques to monitor drug effects in the brains of people living with the disease, according to Duke University researchers.
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Tandem lytic agent therapy offers advantages

The absence of urokinase from the thrombolytic market spawned a search for alternative lytic agents. After a rocky start that included bleeding complications, research focused on combination therapies.
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CT scanners vary widely in relative radiation dose

They may look identical, and they may be manufactured by only a handful of vendors, but like snowflakes, no two CT scanners are alike. Consequently, imagers trying to reduce patient dose must look at an individual scanner's calibrations.
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Radiologists report conditional satisfaction with teleradiology

As teleradiology case volume grows along with radiologists' experience with the technology, a new survey has investigated whether radiologists' satisfaction with teleradiology is also increasing.
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MR imaging tracks bone invasion by soft-tissue sarcoma

An MR exam before surgical therapy for soft-tissue sarcomas can tell doctors whether the tumor has penetrated into adjacent bone, according to a recent study. Such information may improve patient management.
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ACR ethics committee scrutinizes expert testimony

A program developed by the American College of Radiology will give its members the opportunity to file complaints and seek sanctions when they believe that a fellow member has given inaccurate or biased testimony in a medical malpractice proceeding.
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Survival rates for liver RFA match those of surgery

Immediate and short-term results are important in validating a new procedure's efficacy. But to have legs, the procedure must be at least as good as the gold standard.
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Eroding interventional neuroradiology turf raises red flag

During the past decade, neuroradiologists have created and perfected interventional procedures to treat aneurysms, acute infarction, and carotid stenosis. But competition from nonradiologists will continue to grow unless the discipline produces more well-trained interventionalists.
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Alma mater may determine risk for lawsuits

Good professors? Check. Well-funded research facilities? Check. History of producing graduates who go on to be sued? Prospective medical students should be aware that attending schools with graduates who are frequently sued may put them at greater risk for litigation, according to a recent study.
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Digital subtraction plus digital mammography equals improved diagnosis

Researchers have applied an old technique to a new imaging technology to create a possibly more powerful way to diagnose breast cancer.
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Ultrasound finds rib fractures missed by x-ray

For most people, undetected rib fractures mean long-standing pain and severe potential complications. For elderly patients, the prognosis may be even worse.
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Emotional stress lights up same region on fMRI as physical pain

For centuries, the ache of a broken heart has been the domain of poets, while the pain of a broken bone has fallen to the care of doctors. But new research has found that they are neural cousins, showing activation of similar brain regions.
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Ultrasound reveals cause of carpal tunnel syndrome

When it comes to carpal tunnel syndrome, ultrasound's diagnostic accuracy offers an alternative to distressing electrophysiological studies, according to researchers in Egypt.
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AmeriScan shuts down remaining screening centers

After most of its locations across the nation closed in the last several months, AmeriScan has locked up its last two remaining centers. The shutdown comes barely a week after a lawsuit was announced in California charging the embattled whole-body screening firm with engaging in false advertising practices regarding its breast MR services.
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MR competes well with ultrasound in the prostate

For many radiologists around the globe, ultrasound is the diagnostic modality of choice to evaluate the prostate. But MR has shown it is capable of delivering diagnostic information on par with transrectal power Doppler ultrasound.
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Mammography recall rates differ across the Atlantic

U.S. radiologists recall mammography patients and perform negative open surgical biopsies at twice the rate as their U.K. counterparts, according to researchers at the University of California, San Francisco.
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FDA sounds alarm over drug-eluting stent

Six months after the FDA approved the drug-eluting coronary stent Cypher from Cordis, it has issued a warning that the device causes adverse events, including death.
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MRS differentiates pediatric tumors in pons

Many children diagnosed with diffuse pontine gliomas die within a year. Studies have found that MR spectroscopy adds information that may help extend such patients' lives.
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Radiology crunch prompts imagers to work smarter

Demand for imaging services is predicted to far outstrip radiologist availability in coming years, but group practices are finding ways to make the most out of their day. In the short term, signs indicate that the radiologist shortage may be taking a breather.
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California sues AmeriScan over breast MR claims

The state of California and California Medical Board filed a suit Wednesday accusing AmeriScan, the whole-body screening company, of false statements in advertising breast MR screening services.
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Comment: Web or not, DICOM standard remains vital

[EDITOR'S NOTE: This letter was sent to Diagnostic Imaging in response to a Web news article published Oct. 1. The authors are Dr. David Clunie and Dr. Peter Mildenberger, both cochairs of the DICOM Standards Committee.]
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Regulators pose potential threat to high-field MR

Concern is growing within the MR community over proposed European Union regulations that would prohibit workers' direct exposure to higher field strength magnets.
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New stent bridges wide-neck aneurysms for embolization

A highly flexible, self-expanding neurovascular stent has been successfully used as a bridge to keep the parent artery open while detachable coils were inserted into a wide-neck aneurysm, according to a German study.
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Fast spin-echo imaging at 4.7T becomes feasible

Producing high-resolution images of the brain at magnetic fields higher than 3T has challenged MR researchers for years. The oft-cited hurdle -- radio-frequency-related inconsistencies -- is no longer a concern, according to British investigators.
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3D virtual colonoscopy gets thumbs up

One of the largest prospective studies to date on the effectiveness of screening virtual colonoscopy has stamped approval on 3D endoluminal displays for primary reads.
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RTs interpret images, perform other advanced duties

The American College of Radiology recently endorsed the training of radiologist assistants (RAs). These so-called supertechs will perform meta-duties to help ease the caseloads of harried radiology practices. But run-of-the-mill radiologic technologists already perform many of these tasks, including interpreting images.
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More CT screening centers close doors

AmeriScan, the whole-body scanning business that recently began to offer breast MRI, has closed all but two of its nationwide locations.
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Mammographic architectural distortion eludes CAD

Architectural distortion is proving elusive to commercially available computer-aided detection systems, according to a study at Duke University Medical Center.
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GE reaches for molecular diagnostics in bid for Amersham

GE Medical Systems has bid $9.5 billion for Amersham, signaling an unprecedented expansion of the company's medical systems business beyond the traditional boundaries of medical imaging into molecular diagnostics. If the deal goes through, GEMS, and possibly the radiology industry, will be transformed.
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Damadian campaigns for Nobel recognition

Dr. Raymond Damadian launched a public relations broadside Thursday against the Nobel Committee after this year's Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to Dr. Paul Lauterbur and Prof. Peter Mansfield for discoveries linked to the invention of MRI.
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RSNA lures young talent into academia

When young radiologists -- perhaps fresh out of residency -- from all corners of the world publish research following its presentation at the RSNA meeting, odds are it doesn't happen by chance.
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Monitor quality needs monitoring itself

The introduction by several PACS vendors of active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD)-based monitors has prompted concern over their increasing use in primary diagnoses.
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CE-MRA earns 'unreliable' label for measuring carotid stenosis

Evidence continues to mount that contrast-enhanced MR angiography for imaging the carotids is less robust than previously thought. Researchers are taking a second look at 3D time-of-flight MRA for assessing carotid artery stenosis.
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MRI pioneers win Nobel Prize

The Nobel Committee showed a preference for basic science over discoveries based on its application Monday. U.S. chemist Paul C. Lauterbur, Ph.D., and British physicist Sir Peter Mansfield, Ph.D., won the 2003 Nobel Prize for medicine for their work on the development of MRI.
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Docs take to technology faster than consumers

Although radiologists traditionally are at the forefront of technological advances, physicians of all stripes are adopting high-speed Internet access and personal digital assistants.
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3D reconstruction benefits IR lab

Workstations capable of rendering large amounts of data in real-time have a potentially important role to play in the interventional radiology lab, according to a U.S. radiologist speaking at the Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE) meeting in Antalya, Turkey, last week.
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Radiology reading room gets a makeover

The impact of PACS and informatics technologies has radiology departments reimagining their reading rooms. A functional redesign takes planning and faces many potential pitfalls, according to Dr. Eliot Siegel, chief of radiology and nuclear medicine at the VA Maryland Health Care System.
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Worldwide Web takes over image distribution

Radiologists are using rapidly advancing communications technology to look for solutions that will take them beyond their department in terms of providing instant images and radiology reports.
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Radiology determines new digital Holy Grail

After obtaining the all-digital radiology department, radiologists are setting their sites on a new goal: the electronic round-trip.
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Average PCs pass Web-based viewing test

Web-based image distribution is a popular choice among hospitals trying to extend PACS access beyond the radiology department. And the expense of equipping every department with sufficient PCs for hospital-wide viewing need not be prohibitive, according to researchers in Germany.
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U.K. okays interventional procedures

An advisory body in the U.K. has given its stamp of approval to three interventional procedures, while holding back on a fourth until more evidence comes in.
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Combined MRI/FDG-PET proves useful in breast cancer

FDG-PET and MRI are comparable in imaging patients with suspected breast cancer or recurrent disease, according to researchers in Germany and Switzerland.
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CAD significantly boosts mammography sensitivity

The use of computer-aided detection could raise radiologists' detection sensitivity by as much as 21%, according to researchers in Washington, DC.
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MR techniques pinpoint early HIV signs

Conventional imaging techniques haven't yet been able to open a window into the mechanisms underlying minor motor deficits associated with the human immunodeficiency virus-1.
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PET helps rule out head and neck tumors

Recurrent head and neck tumors can be detected or ruled out using FDG-PET, according to researchers in the U.S. and China. The team from the University of Michigan and Hong Kong's North District Hospital evaluated 44 patients with FDG-PET to detect suspected or recurrent nonsquamous carcinomas.
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Breast MR screening detects high rate of DCIS cancers

MRI, with its low specificity, may not be ready to screen the general population for breast cancer. But a recent study finds that it is effective in detecting cancer early. Researchers have found that breast MR screening detects a significant number of preinvasive in situ carcinomas.
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MDCT uses less radiation than DSA to detect pulmonary emboli

While CT has consistently been proven better than digital subtraction angiography for detecting pulmonary emboli, dose considerations remain. With multidetector-row CT scanners, however, those concerns may no longer be relevant, according to Dutch researchers.
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CAD provides reproducible mammography results

Recent investigations into mammography with computer-aided detection have focused on sensitivity and accuracy. Having validated those parameters, researchers testing CAD's reproducibility have found that it is attainable using commercially available technology.
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PET accurately detects unknown primary tumors

FDG-PET is useful to detect the primary tumor in patients with unknown primary tumors, according to a meta-analysis by Spanish researchers. They suggest that PET's intermediate specificity, high sensitivity, and concomitant low false-negative rate offer substantial benefits in the initial stages of oncologic patient management.
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PET shows smoking's effects on organs

Cigarette smoke's ability to damage the lungs is well documented. Less well understood are its effects on other organs. For the first time, researchers have used PET to document enzymatic changes from tobacco smoke in the kidneys, heart, and spleen.
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Brachytherapy boosts RFA for lung cancer

Radio-frequency ablation, which has recently been shown effective in treating certain lung tumors, might be even more effective in the same population when combined with brachytherapy, according to Rhode Island researchers.
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Baseline MR scans can predict MS

A baseline MRI exam of the brain and spinal cord is enough to predict whether a patient will develop multiple sclerosis, according to new guidelines from the American Academy of Neurology.
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Pathology lab tests virtual microscope

German researchers have developed a virtual microscope system that allows histological information to be evaluated, transferred, and stored in digital format. IT experts at the Charité Institute of Pathology in Berlin hope the system's advanced functionality will persuade pathologists to abandon conventional light microscopes for routine diagnostic work.
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PET only adds more dollars to standard Alzheimer's workup

Adding FDG-PET to the standard strategy used at specialized centers to diagnose Alzheimer's disease would not be cost-effective, according to Boston researchers.
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RoboDoc will see you now

Hospital information technology has found a unique way of responding to the acute shortage of healthcare workers. A new high-tech robot now under evaluation at Johns Hopkins Hospital, "virtually" connects physicians with their patients.
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UAE success increases with experience

Experienced physicians perform uterine artery embolizations in a timelier manner than their inexperienced counterparts, according to results from one of the largest studies delving into the safety of UAE.
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Scientist's tumor spurs idea for better image comparison

When Gregory D. Lancaster, Ph.D., a researcher at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, had a brain tumor removed, he watched anxiously as radiologists squinted at serial MR scans. He feared they might miss something important.
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Aneurysm treatment calls for mandatory imaging follow-up

Endovascular treatment of aneurysms is less invasive than surgical clipping. But physicians must follow up the treatment for more than the traditional six months for it to be effective, according to a new study.
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CT dose reduction techniques address pulmonary embolism, DVT

Although CT pulmonary angiography and CT venography can diagnose pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis in one study, clinicians are concerned about increased radiation exposure. Multidetector-row CT adjustments can help lower the dose, according to German researchers.
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NIH chief foresees critical need for musculoskeletal radiologists

As baby boomers survive heart conditions and malignant tumors, and limp into old age with fragile bones and creaky joints, musculoskeletal radiologists can expect a major increase in workload.
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MRS separates vascular dementia from Alzheimer's disease

MR spectroscopy allows physicians to distinguish between dementia caused by restricted blood flow to the brain and dementia related to Alzheimer's disease, according to researchers at the University of California, San Francisco.
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Serial MRI can serve as Alzheimer's biomarker

MRI volumes measured over time are valid biomarkers of pathologic progression of Alzheimer's disease across a range of clinical states, according to Oregon researchers.
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Focused ultrasound ablation works in breast cancer

Since its inception in 2000, MRI-guided focused ultrasound ablation had been proven effective only on benign breast lesions. It is also safe and effective on malignant lesions, according to Canadian researchers.
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CT checks PET false positives in esophagus

When it comes to detecting primary and metastatic disease in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, it's best to back up PET scans with CT data. Chronic inflammatory diseases could inflate PET's false-positive results, according to a study from Korea.
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PET teams with CT for lung cancer screening

The selective use of PET imaging with low-dose spiral CT in high-risk patients effectively detects early-stage lung cancer, according to Italian researchers.
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Web site sheds new light on evidence-based radiology

Radiologists can now visit a Web site dedicated to evidence-based medicine. An online resource (www.evidencebasedradiology.net) developed at St. Vincent's University Hospital in Dublin aims to demystify the principles behind evidence-based radiology (EBR) and guide users step-by-step through the process.
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Ballet dancers' MR scans keep doctors on their toes

It comes as no surprise that ballet dancers regularly suffer from foot and ankle pain. Hours spent practicing repetitive jumping, landing, and balancing moves -- with toes tightly pointed or feet splayed out -- are guaranteed to take their toll. Now MRI is helping doctors diagnose the precise cause of dancers' complaints and identify characteristic injuries.
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Radiologist leaps into fray in California's race for governor

With a radiologist heading the National Institutes of Health, is a radiologist running for governor of California that far-fetched? Dr. Ronald J. Friedman doesn't think so.
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Call goes out for self-referred imaging center guidelines

It's time for the professional community, including the RSNA and the American College of Radiology, to develop guidelines for self-referred whole-body CT screening, according to researchers at Stanford University.
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Pediatric CT protocol produces quality images at lower dose

Researchers have developed size-dependent technique factors that allow technologists to consistently and uniformly reduce CT dose to small patients without hindering image quality.
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Case for MR-guided breast biopsy finds support

MR-detected breast lesions without an ultrasound correlate should be followed up with MR-guided intervention, according to New York City researchers.
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Researchers tame diabetic metabolism for FDG-SPECT imaging

Diabetic patients suffer twofold regarding ischemic myocardiopathy: They are at increased risk for the disease, and their metabolism wreaks havoc with nuclear medicine tracer kinetics.
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CTA software allows 'one-click' bone removal

The bony structure in the skull base imposes many difficulties for diagnostic CT angiography. Vendors and software manufacturers have devised various methods to overcome this limitation. Research presented at the European Congress of Radiology in March found two prototype bone removal programs from Philips Medical Systems to be fast and reliable.
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Teleradiology liberates U.S. Air Force

In 1999, the Air Force had 147 radiologists. It expects to have as few as 48 by 2004. The number of military radiologists is expected to be only 50% of what is needed by this summer. The problem is simple economics: No service branch can compete with pay structures in civilian practice.
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Order entry system checks appropriateness of scan

An image ordering system for physicians has surfaced at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston in an attempt to stem the growing number of unnecessary imaging exams ordered.
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Soft-copy environment provides dynamic ways to view image data

The transition to filmless operation is forcing radiologists to move away from static hard-copy interpretation methods and toward a more dynamic mode of interpretation, according to research conducted at the VA Medical Center in Baltimore.
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Pregnancy imaging policy addresses radiation concerns

Radiologists at the University of Iowa had been reluctant to use multidetector CT on pregnant patients without considering other diagnostic options. But some referring physicians viewed this caution as an infringement on their rights to treat their patients.
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Ultrasound-MR duo could replace angio in carotids

When duplex sonography and MR angiography are combined and lead to concordant results regarding carotid stenosis, radiologists may forgo digital subtraction angiography, according to German researchers.
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Coronary screening with EBCT targets certain risk groups

Older men and women at intermediate risk of cardiovascular disease should receive electron-beam CT screening, according to New York researchers.
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MRS accurately targets malignant prostate disease

MR spectroscopy is an accurate and noninvasive way to confirm prostate cancer diagnosis for those with an elevated serum PSA. The combination of MRS and PSA data could potentially provide better preoperative management, according to researchers in Australia.
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New MR imaging agent moves closer to FDA approval

An MR contrast agent designed to linger longer in the vasculature than agents currently available has proved successful for a variety of vascular sites. FDA approval could come by mid-2004.
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Evidence mounts that RFA works on solid renal masses

Evidence of percutaneous radio-frequency ablation's success in treating solid renal tumors keeps mounting. The procedure is minimally invasive, safe, and effective, according to studies published simultaneously by Brown University and Mayo Clinic researchers.
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Cost of peripheral CTA compares favorably with MRA

Multidetector-row CT angiography has the potential to be cost-effective for evaluating patients with intermittent claudication, according to researchers from the Netherlands and the U.S.
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MR cholangiography readies to supplant direct cholangiography

MR cholangiography now rivals direct cholangiography for imaging biliary stenosis. And with improvements in resolution, MRC should become the imaging method of choice for this patient population, according to researchers at the Hopital Edouard Herriot in Lyon, France.
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MR centers sue insurance companies for payment

Premier Open MRI, a Jacksonville, FL, imaging center, has been named as the lead plaintiff in a class action suit alleging insurance coverage abuse in the Sunshine State.
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FDA loosens reins on investigational MR

MR researchers may now perform investigations on scanners up to 8T without FDA permission. The previous guideline, issued in 1997, set the limit at 4T.
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ICU patients may skirt daily chest x-rays

For many mechanically ventilated intensive care patients, getting daily chest x-rays has become a mantra in hospitals across the U.S. This practice, however, may have little benefit, according to Harvard researchers.
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Functional MR reveals the Zen of golf

Golfers have said for years, it's all between the ears. Now, scientists have proved them right.
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Bigger doesn't mean better in brain MRS tesla

Three-T proton MR spectroscopy does not surpass the diagnostic capability of 1.5T MRS for distinguishing certain cognitive diseases. But advances in engineering should improve the higher field strength's diagnostic spectroscopic capability, according to Mayo Clinic researchers.
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Functional MRI monitors therapy for ductal breast carcinoma

Physicians can accurately gauge the effectiveness of chemotherapy treatment by using high-temporal-resolution MR methods to track angiogenesis, according to researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and Saint Elizabeth's Medical Center.
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Report from ISMRM: Dark lumen MR colonography tops bright lumen imaging -- up to a point

Studies presented at the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine annual meeting extolled the virtues of dark lumen MR colonography. Although researchers found that 3D gradient-echo imaging is more effective and easier to perform than bright lumen imaging, they were reluctant to relegate bright lumen to the scrap heap.
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Report from ISMRM: Whole-body MRI and PET/CT fight to a draw

With MRI and dual-modality PET/CT both capable of whole-body imaging, it was only a matter of time before the two modalities went toe-to-toe to determine which is better at surveying the body for metastatic disease.
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Report from ISMRM: MRCP tops ERCP for patients with suspected bile duct obstruction

Results from a large randomized trial give radiologists good reason to adopt MR cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) to examine patients suspected to be at intermediate risk of bile duct obstruction or bile duct stones. The study was presented Monday at the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine meeting.
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Report from ISMRM: Pettigrew reveals his vision of medical imaging's future

At a conference increasingly associated with metabolic and physiologic imaging, Dr. Roderic Pettigrew, director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, shared his vision of 21st century radiology.
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Report from ISMRM: ISMRM meeting shows no ill effects from postponement

The annual meeting of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine is proceeding smoothly in Toronto this week, almost as if its two-month postponement because of a fatal outbreak of SARS had never happened.
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Search continues for widely available measures of cerebral blood flow

The realm of quantifying cerebral blood flow has plenty of room for improvement, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of California, San Francisco. Dynamic susceptibility contrast MR perfusion imaging is the latest modality to reveal its weaknesses.
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Ultrasound predicts age-related cardiovascular problems

Echocardiography can predict the first cardiovascular events in elderly subjects, according to researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. It could become an inexpensive screening tool for cardiovascular disease in an aging population.
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MRI gains favor for early, accurate DVT diagnosis

Prompt detection of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) can play a vital role in preventing the condition from evolving into a potentially fatal pulmonary embolism (PE). As the quest to improve DVT diagnosis continues, MRI may emerge as a viable contender, according to a comprehensive study presented at last year's RSNA meeting.
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MR market cools down from last year's records

MR sales in the U.S. slowed in the first quarter of 2003 from last year's pace. But whether the drop in shipments is a sign of a slowdown or just a seasonal adjustment is unclear.
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Europe's hospitals play catch-up

Hospitals throughout Western Europe increasingly rely on aging medical imaging hardware, as squeezed healthcare budgets and a lack of long-term financial planning keep the lid on regular upgrades and replacements. The slide toward outdated equipment may be halted only by massive investment in modern systems.
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Radiologists' salaries jump again

The average salary offered to recruit radiologists grew by 13% in 2002, according to a survey by Merritt, Hawkins & Associates of Irving, TX.
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Dynamic Gd-enhanced MR imaging demonstrates accuracy in diagnosing osteoid osteoma

Tacking on a dynamic gadolinium-enhanced sequence to indeterminate nonenhanced MRIs may eliminate the need for an additional CT study for patients with osteoid osteoma, according to researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, AZ.
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iCAD sues R2 for patent infringement

Computer-aided detection system manufacturer iCAD filed a lawsuit in federal court Tuesday against rival developer R2 for patent infringement.
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Better imaging may not guarantee better results

Turning to the newest imaging technology may not always be the best policy in managing patients with low back pain. New technologies like faster MR afford marginally better imaging results but may also lead to increased surgeries and costs, according to researchers in Washington.
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Australian state tightens CT screening rules

Owners of CT screening clinics in Australia's oldest and most populous state risk finding themselves in court if they continue to offer whole-body scans to healthy walk-in clients.
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CT imagers predict 128-row scanners

Multidetector CT quickly leaped from four rows to eight to 16. And that's just the beginning. Radiologists may one day acquire up to 128 slices simultaneously, said researchers at the fifth annual International Symposium on Multidetector-Row CT Wednesday in San Francisco.
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News from SNM: FLT surpasses FDG in predicting breast cancer response to chemotherapy

Researchers have long recognized that FDG is less than ideal as the PET agent for evaluating how cancers respond to treatment. Chemotherapy produces inflammation in tumors and adjacent normal tissues, raising FDG activity and making evaluation of cancer growth and aggressiveness more difficult.
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Payment for brain tumor spectroscopy looks dim

A government-commissioned technology assessment of MR spectroscopy for brain tumors has come up short. This does not bode well for Medicare coverage.
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News from SNM: PET and SPECT track myocardial regeneration after stem cell infusion

Stem cell therapy to stimulate heart muscle growth, and thus restore myocardial function lost after severe infarction, can be monitored by PET and SPECT. A German study presented Monday at the Society of Nuclear Medicine annual meeting demonstrated the value of the two tests, while providing insight into the unique restorative procedure.
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News from SNM: Progress in molecular imaging underscores importance of anatomical modalities

Molecular imaging technologies are pulling physicians into the realm of preventive medicine and allowing better management of occult disease. But these data have to be put in anatomical context to achieve the best results, said speakers at the annual meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine in New Orleans June 21 to 24.
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News from SNM: New trials highlight FDG's role as surrogate marker

Promising results with Gleevec may grab headlines. But the value of FDG-PET as a surrogate marker for the response to cancer therapy remains undimmed, according to results presented Sunday at the Society of Nuclear Medicine meeting in New Orleans.
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Multidetector CTA ups diagnostic ante for brain aneurysms

Multidetector CT angiography will soon replace catheter angiography as the diagnostic gold standard for patients with intracranial aneurysms, according to Swiss researchers.
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Handheld ultrasound and stethoscope make up new diagnostic duo

Looking for a means to improve on the classic stethoscope, University of Chicago physicians are taking diagnostic imaging techniques into their own hands -- literally.
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RSNA woos mainstream media to radiology

The RSNA plans to raise radiology's visibility by presenting some of the discipline's newest techniques to the New York City media.
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Hefty federal fine forces stent maker to close doors

Endovascular Technologies, makers of a stent to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms, has ceased operations after being fined nearly $100 million for covering up malfunctions associated with its product.
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Ultrasound goes to the movies

New PACS software allows the storage of ultrasound cine-loops, which give surgeons an opportunity to better plan certain procedures based on ultrasound's functional evaluation of various organs. Dr. Peter Kovacs and colleagues from University Hospital in Innsbruck, Austria, reported their experience with loops at the 10th Congress of the World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology in Montreal.
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Sonographic features define metastatic lymph nodes

Several sonographic features used in combination can reliably distinguish lymph nodes with a low probability of malignancy from those with a high probability, according to researchers from the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.
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Dynamic hyperpolarized helium imaging captures lung airways clearly

Imaging patients with MR as they breath in hyperpolarized helium allows physicians to map out airway branching in the lungs up to the seventh generation, according to research from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.
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RFA kills benign bone tumors

Radio-frequency ablation, fast gaining credibility in treatment of soft-tissue tumors, is showing promise for osteoid osteomas as well, according to Johns Hopkins University researchers.
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Report from SCAR: Image processing saves time, improves diagnostic accuracy

The transition to filmless operation is forcing radiologists to move away from static hard-copy interpretation methods and toward a more dynamic mode of interpretation, according to research conducted at the VA Medical Center in Baltimore.
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Report from SCAR: Etch-a-sketch security inhibits wireless promise

Wireless technologies in medicine offer flexibility and openness, but neither promise has been realized. The reason is security schemes that remain porous and essentially worthless.
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Report from SCAR: The perfect academic reading room: Build it and they will hum

If form follows function, redesigned reading rooms should follow PACS, a SCAR scientific session audience was told Sunday morning.
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Report from SCAR: Key images cut through the clutter

The Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise Key Image Note integration profile promises the ability to zero in on the most pertinent images in a large exam. Such a profile will save time, reduce impact on the network, and ultimately prepare radiologists for structured reporting, according to Dr. Gary Wendt, an assistant professor of radiology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.
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News from WFUMB: Ultrasound complements negative mammograms

Medicolegal issues leave little room for error in breast screening, and ultrasound is emerging as an inexpensive, easy, and readily available complement to mammography. Used in conjunction with mammography, it improves sensitivity for breast carcinoma, according to a study presented at the World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology meeting in Montreal.
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News from WFUMB: Contrast-enhanced ultrasound is specific for focal liver lesions

The use of echo contrast agents improves the diagnostic ability of ultrasonography to detect and differentiate liver tumors. But contrast agents have different features and there are numerous examination techniques.
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Radiologists step up to the bat in Sosa cork controversy

And he's safe. That is the verdict of Cooperstown, NY, and Chicago radiologists concerning the five bats Sammy Sosa donated to the National Baseball Hall of Fame.
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News from WFUMB: Ultrasound plays role in assessing tumor angiogenesis

A dual-transducer method of 3D ultrasound contrast agent imaging will enable researchers to track angiogenesis in tumor masses, according to research presented at the World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology meeting in Montreal.
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ARRS names Thrall new president

The American Roentgen Ray Society has named Dr. James H. Thrall its new president for the 2003-2004 term.
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News from WFUMB: Contrast-enhanced ultrasound points to malignant lymph nodes

Positive identification of malignant axillary lymph nodes will improve patient selection for biopsy, but Doppler sonography's effectiveness is limited by slow blood flow or very small vessels. Microbubble contrast-enhanced ultrasound overcomes these limitations, according to a study presented at the World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology meeting in Montreal on Tuesday.
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News from WFUMB: Navigation system fuses ultrasound with multimodalities

Ultrasound studies can be coregistered effectively with images from CT, MR, SPECT, and PET, according to research presented at the World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology meeting in Montreal on Tuesday.
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News from WFUMB: Contrast-enhanced ultrasound improves prostate cancer detection

Tumor angiogenesis, measured as microvessel density and located with color Doppler ultrasound, could improve imagers' ability to find prostate cancer, according to a new study by U.S. and European researchers.
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News from WFUMB: Doppler targeted biopsy misses mark in prostate

Targeted prostate biopsy performed on the basis of high-frequency color or power Doppler findings will miss a substantial number of cancers detected with sextant biopsy, according to U.S. and European researchers.
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News from WFUMB: Civilians and robots perform remotely guided ultrasound

The operator-dependent nature of diagnostic ultrasound may reduce its versatility in military medical units, research expeditions, or mass-casualty areas. And local care providers in remote and sparsely populated locations may lack image acquisition and/or interpretation expertise.
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News from WFUMB: Ultrasound physician extenders lend hand to busy radiologists

When several offsite ultrasound rooms opened simultaneously, the caseload for radiologists at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor became too burdensome to manage. They trained two experienced sonographers as physician assistants, or ultrasound practitioners, to triage and dictate cases from the main hospital site.
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News from WFUMB: Point-of-care ultrasound reduces hospital stay, mortality

Limited ultrasonography performed at the point of care may reduce emergency department -- as well as hospital -- length of stay and mortality. Cost savings may also be substantial, according to research presented at the 10th Congress of the World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology in Montreal on Monday.
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PET fails to match sentinel node biopsy for melanoma staging

PET is not a reliable technique for primary staging of melanoma, according to Dutch researchers.
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Hong Kong radiologists launch first SARS symposium

As new cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) continue to pop up around the globe, imagers in Asia are compiling what is known about the disease's presentation on clinical images.
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Demand for techs soars, salaries follow

A long streak of increases in both demand and salaries has favored radiologists. Imaging technologists are following suit, according to a recent survey conducted by Allied Consulting in Dallas.
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PET/CT works better than PET alone in head and neck cancers

PET/CT compared with PET alone improved radiologists' confidence level in head and neck cancers, according to Swiss researchers reporting at the European Congress of Radiology meeting in March. University of Pittsburgh investigators came to the same conclusion in a study presented at the American Society of Neuroradiologists meeting in April.
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MR improves with age in fetal imaging

MRI can be an extremely effective modality for making complex central nervous system diagnoses in the fetus after 30 weeks of gestation, according to researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center.
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FDG-PET provides bang for its buck in lung cancer diagnosis

Using FDG-PET to diagnose lung cancer in a selective group of patients is cost-effective, according to researchers at Stanford University and the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System.
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High-field fMRI proves useful for microscopic brain mapping

The same principle that limits blood oxygen level-dependent MRI at low fields may make it useful for submillimeter-scale brain mapping at 4T and 7T, according to Minnesota researchers.
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Ultrasound edges out mammography in younger women

When it comes to diagnosing breast cancer in symptomatic women, age counts, according to researchers in Australia. For women under 45, sonography is more accurate than mammography. It could be the best initial imaging test in this patient group.
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High seas and sandstorms test equipment durability

Radiology has formed part of the military's medical arsenal for more than 100 years. Reports from the Boer War of 1899 to 1902, for example, describe both sides using crude x-ray units to find bullets lodged in injured soldiers.
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Acetate PET shows promise for detecting prostate cancer

Determining whether recurrent prostate cancer is local or metastatic dramatically affects patient therapy. Carbon-11 acetate PET imaging not only demonstrates a definite uptake in prostate cancer recurrence, it also provides a higher sensitivity than FDG-PET in the same application, according to a study from Washington University in St. Louis.
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ACR approves title change for 'standards'

Members of the American College of Radiology council overwhelmingly approved a resolution changing the name "ACR standards" to "ACR practice guidelines and technical standards" at the organization's annual meeting in Washington, DC, this week.
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American Journal of Roentgenology names new editor-in-chief

Dr. Robert J. Stanley will assume the editor-in-chief position at the American Journal of Roentgenology on Nov. 1, taking over the reins from Dr. Lee Rogers.
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CT interpretation varies widely from specialized centers to general hospitals

CT reading at general hospitals and specialized centers is playing in two completely different ballparks, according to Harvard Medical School researchers. Healthcare and government administrators should take note when they assess physician productivity.
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MRS gauges liver disease severity

The ability of MR spectroscopy to distinguish patients with mild liver disease from those with moderate to severe disease makes the noninvasive procedure a prime candidate to replace liver biopsy, according to a study performed in the U.K.
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Nanoparticle-enhanced MR identifies prostate lymph node metastases

An early product of molecular imaging R&D appears ready for clinical adoption as a prostate cancer staging tool.
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Report from ARRS: What you don't know may hurt your patients

Physicians may not be telling their patients all they need to know about radiation doses, mostly because they ignore the information themselves, according to researchers from Yale University.
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Single MR image helps calculation of important fat ratio

Imagers could slim down their fat-detecting imaging arsenal to a single MR slice, according to researchers at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital.
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CT for appendicitis diagnosis in children gains popularity

CT is making rapid inroads in pediatric appendicitis diagnosis, even though concerns about radiation exposure in children continue to dog the modality, according to a two-year follow-up survey of North American Society for Pediatric Radiology members.
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MR improves accuracy of fetal imaging

Fetal MRI is becoming more mainstream. In the experience of pediatric radiologists at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, it definitely improves the accuracy of diagnosis in fetal abnormalities.
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Report from ARRS: PET proves its worth in the colon

FDG-PET is a sensitive and accurate tool to detect colon carcinomas, according to a study presented Tuesday morning at the American Roentgen Ray Society annual meeting in San Diego.
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Report from ARRS: MR tops ultrasound for fetal weight calculation

MRI could offer another radiation-free alternative to calculate the weight of a fetus, and it may be more accurate than ultrasound biometry, the current gold standard, according to Texas researchers.
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Report from ARRS: MRI and iron oxide agents break new ground

New MR applications using ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) contrast agents could be possible in genitourinary and ob/gyn imaging, according to several studies presented Monday at the American Roentgen Ray Society annual meeting in San Diego.
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Report from ARRS: MRA chases DSA in abdominal imaging

MR angiography could soon replace digital subtraction angiography for evaluation of abdominal arterial disease, according to researchers in Philadelphia.
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Stenting treatment could stopper wide-neck aneurysms

Patients with wide-neck aneurysms may be able to avoid traditional surgical clipping with the advent of a novel stenting procedure, according to physicians at the University of Maryland Medical Center.
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Report from ASNR: MRS finds place in pediatric brain trauma

Traumatic brain injury that negatively affects academic achievement, psychosocial adjustment, and adaptive functioning leads to poor recovery over two to four years. No single parameter exists to predict improvement.
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Radiology conferences respond to shifting SARS advisories

With the World Health Organization having lifted its travel advisory for Toronto on April 29, the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine has rescheduled its annual meeting for July 10 to 16. The conference was originally scheduled to take place in Toronto in May.
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Report from ASNR: Computers and math help techs align head exams

Variability in brain MR and CT patient head positioning may yield significant inter- and intrastudy image variance in the clinical setting. Research has focused on computer- and technologist-driven methods to standardize the technique.
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Report from ASNR: Dose concerns play role in brain shunt imaging

As concern grows over CT-related radiation exposure, researchers are experimenting with "quick brain" MR imaging as an alternative to evaluate patients with shunted hydrocephalus.
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Report from ASNR: MR angiography works in pediatric vascular abnormalities

The vascular nature of most head and neck anomalies can usually be assessed clinically. When this is not possible, catheter angiography remains the reference standard for both the definitive diagnosis of the vascular nature and the delineation of vascular anatomy.
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Report from ASNR: Both CT and MR perfusion studies show merit with vasospasm

Vasospasm is regarded as the leading cause of death and disability in patients surviving the initial bleeding of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Several studies presented at the American Society of Neuroradiology meeting on Monday show favorable results for emerging noninvasive diagnostic techniques that offer an alternative to conventional angiography and transcranial Doppler ultrasound.
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Vulnerable plaque gets makeover thanks to MR

For years, plaque was plaque. Then researchers parsed the name into "stable" and "vulnerable." Now researchers are again changing the label to reflect new insights.
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Scintigraphy plays role in detecting metastatic thyroid cancer

Specialists have long questioned indium-111-based somatostatin receptor scintigraphy's (SRS) value for detection of metastatic thyroid cancer. That controversy may be over, according to University of Texas researchers.
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SARS slams radiology meeting schedule

From Singapore to Toronto, radiology conference organizers are either postponing or relocating their summer conferences as a result of fears over severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS).
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Ultraviolet filters cause radiographic artifacts

When you head for the mountains in winter or the beach in summer, take sunscreen along. Just keep it out of the x-ray room. Ultraviolet filters in sun-blocking products cause radiographic artifacts, according to researchers at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia.
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CMS expands Medicare reimbursement for MRA

The week of April 15 is better known for government taking than giving. But on April 16, the government gave the nod to reimburse for MR angiography to Medicare patients with abdominal and pelvic vascular disease under certain clinical circumstances.
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Medicare coverage: PET proponents win some, lose some

The PET community again feels frustration after presenting what it believes is sufficient evidence for Medicare reimbursement and then waiting -- sometimes years -- before the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services denies its requests.
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PET builds case in Parkinson's diagnosis

A functional marker detected with PET scanning may help early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, according to researchers in the U.S and U.K. Trial results may lead to better understanding of PD's progression and treatment.
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Renal artery stenting scores good grades

Interventional radiology researchers are building the case for stenting to treat renal artery stenosis. With five or more years of clinical data behind them in some cases, they presented multiple studies at the Society of Interventional Radiology meeting in Salt Lake City.
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Spiral CT joins forces with scintigraphy to stage digestive endocrine tumors

CT studies can add valuable information to traditional scintigraphy staging of patients with digestive endocrine tumors, according to Italian researchers.
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FDG-PET tops bone scan in picking up bone cancer lesions

FDG-PET imaging can pick up bone metastases and bone marrow lesions missed by traditional bone scans, according to a study of the efficacy of PET imaging for initial and post-therapeutic tumor staging.
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Optical coherence tomography monitors coronary stenting

There is a limit to what conventional imaging can do during coronary artery stenting, especially in assessing microscopic vessel structures. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) might step in to alleviate this deficit, according to U.S. and Japanese researchers.
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MRI guidance reduces pain during discography

Can MRI put the disco back into discography? While an MRI-guided procedure may take a bit longer than traditional CT- or fluoroscopy-guided discography, it allows radiologists to navigate around nerves in the lower back, reducing pain for some patients.
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FDA warning raises interventional radiologists' ire

Interventional radiologists are crying foul about an FDA warning regarding the use of bone cement for spinal fracture procedures.
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Ultrasound catches elbow ligament curve ball

Spring has sprung, and baseball pitchers across the nation are warming up their throwing arms. In some cases, they are also throwing out their pitching elbows. Rather than turning to traditional MRI techniques to detect possible tears in elbow ligaments, researchers at the Thomas Jefferson University Hospital are giving high-resolution ultrasound a chance at the plate.
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MR thermal monitoring of laser ablations gets a boost

T1-weighted MR thermal mapping can accurately track laser-induced ablation of abdominal and pelvic tumors, according to U.K. researchers. Real-time monitoring may help improve overall ablation results and extend its use to other organs.
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Report from SIR: Ultrasound shows promise for treatment of thrombosis

Ultrasound may be just as safe and effective as thrombolytics or mechanical thrombectomy procedures for treating peripheral arterial occlusions, according to a study presented by German researchers at the Society of Interventional Radiology meeting in Salt Lake City last week.
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PET/CT increases radiologists' confidence level

It might have taken a long time for PET to go from theoretical tool to care-planning essential, but integrated PET/CT systems have made the leap much more quickly.
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PET maps out "dual-mindedness" in decision-making

"The Man with Two Brains" may have been an old Steve Martin movie, but it also accurately describes the way humans approach decision-making, according to researchers at the University of Minnesota.
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Report from SIR: Coronary calcium scoring may change behavior

If high cholesterol levels fail to inspire lifestyle changes in people prone to sudden heart attack, coronary calcium scoring might just do the trick, according to a study presented Sunday at the Society of Interventional Radiology meeting in Salt Lake City.
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Report from SIR: Laser, RFA offer effective therapies for varicose veins

Minimally invasive techniques for treatment of varicose veins show good long-term success rates, according to studies presented at the Society of Interventional Radiology meeting in Salt Lake City this week.
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Report from SIR: UFE bolsters young women's fertility hopes

Uterine fibroid embolization shows promise as a safe treatment for young women wanting to preserve fertility, according to data presented Monday by Canadian researchers at the Society of Interventional Radiology meeting in Salt Lake City.
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Report from SIR: Islet cell transplants alleviate severe diabetes

Image-guided infusions of islet cells may allow some patients with diabetes to live without fear, according to research presented Friday at the Society of Interventional Radiology meeting in Salt Lake City.
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Dual stress test results perplex investigators

Radiologists at the Swiss Cardiovascular Center in Bern, Switzerland, are trying to make sense of a trial that established the feasibility of combined wall-motion/stress perfusion MRI. The trial also found wall-motion results so accurate that the addition of perfusion was unable to boost the studies' diagnostic power.
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EBT helps cardiologists correct congenital heart defects

Cardiologists at the University of Illinois Medical Center in Chicago have been using electron-beam tomography to repair major congenital defects.
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Dynamic MR monitors breast cancer response to chemotherapy

Mammography and ultrasound have their place in breast imaging, but dynamic MR seems to be best in monitoring response to treatment, according to researchers in Germany.
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Radiology helps solve mystery of rare respiratory disease

Hong Kong physicians have provided some of the first radiological findings of the pneumonia-like condition known as severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS).
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Sixteen-slice scanners enter pediatric ward

While 16-slice scanners open up new opportunities for pediatric imaging, they also create challenges for moderating dose. Imagers using CT angiography or 3D imaging, or just using faster scans to eliminate the need for sedation, should vary protocols based on the weight and age of their patients.
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FDG-PET complements structural imaging in head and neck tumors

Physicians using FDG-PET alongside CT or MRI after chemotherapy treatment in patients with head and neck tumors can avoid unnecessary surgery, according to researchers in Japan.
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Barium studies rule out esophageal carcinoma

Endoscopy is not necessary to rule out esophageal carcinoma in patients who exhibit benign strictures visible on film, according to radiologists at the University of Pennsylvania. Their conclusions contradict the current gastroenterology literature.
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Researchers find there's nothing new under the sun -- or the ice

Certain medical conditions that we think of as modern might not be so, according to an international team of researchers.
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Ultrasound provides noninvasive follow-up of aortic stent-grafts

Contrast-enhanced ultrasound helps detect endoleaks on stent-grafts of abdominal aortic aneurysms, according to Michigan researchers. The technique may offer an alternative for patients who are allergic to ionizing contrast media.
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Quality trumps quantity in improving mammography interpretation

High-quality feedback may be ideal for improving the accuracy of radiologists interpreting screening mammograms, according to researchers in Wisconsin and Florida.
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FDG-PET guides prognosis and treatment of cervical cancer patients

Rating tumors according to their visual appearance on FDG-PET images is a simple, fast, and reliable method to reach prognosis and direct therapy in patients with cervical cancer, according to researchers at Washington University in St. Louis.
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Report from ECR: Careful choice of iodine contrast can spare sensitive kidneys

Choosing an iso-osmolar dimeric contrast agent can reduce the risk of damage to kidneys in patients with diabetes or impaired renal function, according to a multinational study presented at the European Congress of Radiology in Vienna.
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Report from ECR: Oral contrast makes MR enteroclysis more palatable

Several problems hamper Crohn's disease diagnosis, including the need for repetitive diagnostic assessment and the possibility of incomplete diagnostic information.
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Report from ECR: Amid slings and arrows, ELCAP forges ahead

In almost eight years of screening a high-risk population for lung cancer, Dr. Claudia I. Henschke has learned a thing or two. One is how to survive her critics.
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Report from ECR: Vertebroplasty techniques take new directions

With the reputation of percutaneous vertebroplasty established for relieving osteoporotic pain, researchers are adapting and varying the technique for other conditions.
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Barium studies rule out esophageal carcinoma

Endoscopy is not necessary to rule out esophageal carcinoma in patients who exhibit benign radiographic strictures, according to researchers at the University of Pennsylvania. Their conclusions run contrary to current medical literature from gastroenterologists.
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EBCT and MDCT vie in visualization of coronary arteries

Electron-beam tomography tops multidetector-row CT for visualization of coronary arteries, according to researchers in Germany. But both modalities may offer a viable noninvasive alternative to catheter angiography in patients with suspected coronary disease.
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FDG-PET adds important information for RFA surveillance

Functional imaging techniques such as FDG-PET can detect hepatic tumor activity following radio-frequency ablation therapy long before structural imaging surveillance, according to researchers at the University of Pennsylvania.
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Radiologists hear call to respond to bioterrorist attack

Radiologists could play a crucial role in the event of an attack with biochemical weapons, providing early diagnosis and rapid treatment to victims, according to a meta-study by New Mexico researchers.
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Placebo Journal wants your images

The Placebo Journal is seeking "interesting" images for its X-Ray Files department.
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CAD may revive interest in lung cancer screening

A new computer-aided detection system may bolster the case for lung cancer screening. The technology could improve radiologists' ability to detect micronodules, according to California researchers.
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Gene therapy brings hope for patients facing leg amputation

People with severe circulatory problems could avoid leg amputation by undergoing gene therapy, according to an Ohio study.
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Education board approves new rules for resident duty hours

During its annual winter meeting, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's board of directors approved new standards for resident duty hours.
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Lung cancer screening with low-dose CT should wait

Low-dose CT lung cancer screening has encountered another skeptic: the American College of Chest Physicians.
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Functional MRI documents neural compensation in AD patients

Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have found that the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease compensate in a manner similar to the brains of stroke patients: by reordering functions to relatively unaffected areas.
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Halted drug trial reveals MRI's role in Alzheimer's disease

The trial of milameline as a potential treatment for Alzheimer's disease may have been a bust for the drug, but it has turned out to be promising for imaging. Researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, determined that MRI was a viable biomarker of AD progression.
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RADPAC makes its mark on Capitol Hill

If the size of its political action committee is any indication, radiology's clout in Washington should be increasing.
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MRI accurately diagnoses heart attack in ER patients

Advanced MR technology can detect acute coronary syndrome in emergency room patients with chest pain more accurately and quickly than traditional methods, according to a new study supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI).
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Transcranial ultrasound shows promise for Parkinson's diagnosis

The differential diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease and atypical parkinsonian syndromes may get help from transcranial ultrasound, according to German researchers.
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MRI sniffs out small myocardial infarcts missed by SPECT

Contrast-enhanced cardiovascular MRI can catch small infarcts that may hide from SPECT perfusion imaging, according to researchers at Northwestern University and Duke University.
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Functional MRI identifies pediatric cognitive networks

Children as young as five use the same brain areas for reading as adults do, according to George Washington University researchers. Their findings contribute to the understanding of cognitive skills development and learning disabilities, and may also be helpful in the management of young patients with brain damage.
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Vertebroplasty relieves pain and reduces walking problems

Percutaneous vertebroplasty significantly reduces back pain from compression fractures and allows patients to return to their daily routines, according to a recent retrospective study.
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Diffusion MR could help characterize liver tumors

Diffusion-weighted MRI could help radiologists differentiate between benign and malignant liver tumors without invasive diagnostic procedures, according to researchers in the U.S. and France. It may also eliminate the need for contrast agents for liver imaging in the future.
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Pioneering CT screening centers close doors

CT Screening International, a Southern California pioneer in the entrepreneurial whole-body screening business, shut down its 12 nationwide centers late last year. Calls to the center are answered by a machine, and the company's Web site is down.
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Task force supports DCBE for colorectal cancer

Although colonoscopy is recognized as a superior tool for colorectal cancer screening, double-contrast barium enema can still be considered a valid option. It should be performed more frequently than ever, according to new guidelines issued by the U.S. Multisociety Task Force on Colorectal Cancer.
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Younger women turn to UFE for fibroid reduction

Uterine fibroid embolization's reputation is beginning to attract young patients who want to treat painful symptoms but retain their fertility, according to findings from one of the largest studies to date.
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Bill to keep reimbursement rates sends hope to radiologists and patients

The Senate approved a new spending bill on Jan. 23 that includes a provision to freeze Medicare payment rates at 2002 levels rather than enforce an announced cut of 4.4% set to take place March 1. If signed into law, this bill should have important implications for both radiologists and patients, according to the American College of Radiology.
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Ultrasound guidance tops mammography for surgery of nonpalpable tumors

Ultrasound is a viable alternative to mammography-guided wire localization for surgery of nonpalpable breast tumors, according to researchers at the University of Washington.
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When one PACS isn't enough, academic center develops a second

Radiologists in academic medical centers sometimes find PACS inadequate for teaching purposes because it can be inflexibly configured, inhibiting their ability to modify the original data.
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Ultrasound use slides despite increased reimbursement

CT and MR use may have surged in recent years, but ultrasound appears to be falling behind in the U.S., according to University of Pennsylvania researchers.
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Study builds case for mammography in younger women

Women between the ages of 42 and 49 have a better chance of surviving breast cancer if they undergo regular mammography screening, according to Colorado researchers.
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RF ablation knocks out renal cell carcinoma

Small tumors on the surface of the kidney can't escape from radio-frequency ablation treatment, according to researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital.
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MRI technique offers new approach to diagnosing female infertility

Infertile women are often asked to undergo sonography and conventional hysterosalpingography. But a new MR technique could replace both, according to researchers in Switzerland.
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Laser beats surgery for treatment of varicose veins

Interventional radiologists need to corner the market on endovenous laser treatment of varicose veins while the minimally invasive technique is young. Before long, researchers predict, physicians of all stripes will be performing the procedure.
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CT screening for smokers and ex-smokers shows little benefit

The latest round of number crunching spells trouble for CT lung screening. A research firm estimates a cost of more than $2 million per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained for ex-smokers.
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New radiopharmaceutical agent sheds light on infection

An imaging-friendly variant of a potent antibiotic could aid in treatment planning and follow-up of patients with hard-to-diagnose bacterial infections, according to an international group of researchers.
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SPIO-enhanced MRI edges out CT for detecting liver lesions

Super paramagnetic iron oxide-enhanced MRI could be better than dynamic spiral CT for detecting hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma, according to researchers in Japan.
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Older women benefit from frequent mammography screening

Women older than 75 should undergo frequent mammography screening, according to Texas researchers.
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Contrast-enhanced CT could predict therapy response in cancer patients

The more a tumor enhances on a CT scan, the better the response to chemotherapy will be, according to a study done by researchers in South Korea.
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Researchers map music hot spots in the brain

Wonder why you can't get that new Eminem song out of your head? Researchers at Dartmouth College have come one step closer to discovering why some tunes get stuck in your brain.
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FDG-PET can predict survival of patients with cervical cancer

The location and extent of lymph node metastases demonstrated on FDG-PET may indicate the survival odds in patients with late-stage cervical cancer, according to researchers in St. Louis.
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MRA alone may lead to inappropriate treatment for carotid artery stenoses

A significant number of patients may undergo unnecessary endarterectomies if the decision to surgically treat carotid artery stenosis is based solely on contrast-enhanced MR angiography results, according to Canadian and U.S. researchers.
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Interventional technique tops surgery for ruptured brain aneurysms

Endovascular coil embolization provides a clear advantage over surgical repair for patients suffering from ruptured brain aneurysms, according to initial results from the International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT).
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Radiation dose can be lowered in thinner patients

Yet another reason to stay away from that extra serving of gravy: For those patients who weigh less than 180 pounds, radiologists can reduce CT radiation dose by up to 50% and still achieve quality images, according to researchers at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School.
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CT tops IVP for imaging asymptomatic microhematuria

CT is a better diagnostic tool than excretory urography (IVP) for the initial evaluation of patients with asymptomatic microhematuria, according to a multicenter study.
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Radiologists battle primary-care physician perceptions of DCBE

Radiologists are ready and willing to perform barium enemas, if only primary-care physicians would send patients their way, according to a survey conducted by researchers at the National Cancer Institute and the National Institutes of Health.
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Nuclear cardiology payment locks to accreditation

Insurance companies increasingly rely on voluntary accreditation programs to demonstrate quality and, therefore, validate payment for certain services. Nuclear cardiology is one of the newest disciplines to have its compensation tied to this type of official recognition.
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