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40 y/o, History of Seizures

40 y/o, History of Seizures

  • Case History: A 40-year-old patient presented with history of seizures.
  • Figure 1A. FLAIR images show striated hyperintensity left cerebellar hemisphere.
  • Figure 1B. FLAIR images show striated hyperintensity left cerebellar hemisphere.
  • Figure 1C. FLAIR images show striated hyperintensity left cerebellar hemisphere.
  • Figure 2. T2W image shows hyperintensity in left cerebellar hemisphere.
  • Figure 3. T1WI shows low signal in left cerebellar hemisphere.
  • Figure 4. DWI shows no diffusion restriction.
  • Figure 5. T1 contrast shows no enhancement.
  • Diagnosis: Lhermitte-Duclos disease
  • CT may show a nonspecific hypo attenuating cerebellar mass; calcification is sometimes seen.
  • FDG-PET shows increased uptake.
  • Lhermitte-Duclos disease (LDD), also known as dysplastic cerebellar gangliocytoma, is a rare tumor of the cerebellum.
  • Lhermitte-Duclos disease typically presents in young adults.
  • Symptoms are typically related to raised intracranial pressure, obstructive hydrocephalus and, to a lesser degree, cerebellar dysfunction.
  • The dysplastic mass grows very slowly, and initial treatment revolves around treating hydrocephalus.

Case History: A 40-year-old patient presented with history of seizures.

Comments

Took care of a patient during their final days in 1986. The diagnosis seemingly always connotes a terminal patient.

C. Scott, PA

Charles @

Interesting case. But Dr. Singh's presentation reads like one prepared 20 years ago. Honestly, how can one present such a case without even mentioning PTEN?!

David @

Can you explain why the pt has history of seizure while there is not any lesions at cerebral cortex? It not elevant between clinical and imaging feature????

nguyen @

lhermitte -duclos disease

jan @

Lhermitte-Duclos disease

Ð?еоÑ?гий @

none

jan @

PICA infarct

jeevak @

Excellent case. Thank you very much

MOHAMED @

more AICA than PICA

M @

Looks like an old PICA infarct. Most/all I've seen have mass effect.

Mark @

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