10 Questions with Bruce Reiner, MD

July 27, 2015

For this “10 Questions” series, we spoke with Bruce Reiner, MD, about his work and the future of radiology.

Our "10 Questions" series asks the same questions to a diverse group of professionals in the imaging community.

 

Here, we profiled Charles Kahn, Jr, MD, MS.

- See more at: http://www.diagnosticimaging.com/practice-management/10-questions-charles-kahn-jr-md-ms#sthash.dF7QqaMK.dpuf

Our "10 Questions" series asks the same questions to a diverse group of professionals in the imaging community.

Here, we profiled Bruce Reiner, MD.

1. Please state your name, title and the organization you work for. 

Bruce Reiner, MD, VA Maryland Health Care System.

2. How did you get where you are today?

I’m not exactly sure where I’m at today but I’m still searching.

3. Why did you choose your profession?

I always felt radiology was like detective work with a technology overlay. It’s intellectually stimulating and you get a chance to participate in medical decision making throughout multiple disciplines.

4. What is your biggest day-to-day challenge? 

Trying to survive in a world of consolidation, reduced reimbursements, increased workloads, and service commoditization.

5. What worries, if any, do you have about the future of radiology? If none, where do you think the field is going?

I worry a great deal about commoditization and the emphasis on the economic bottom line, which will ultimately have an adverse effect on quality.

6. What one thing would make your job better?

Modifying the reimbursement model to directly incorporate quality metrics at all levels including exam ordering, image quality, radiation dose reduction, clinical and historical imaging data availability, report quality (including diagnostic confidence and accuracy), and communication.

7. What is your favorite thing about radiology?

The satisfaction one gets in making a difficult diagnosis and having the referring physician and patient appreciate it.

8. What is your least favorite thing about radiology?

  • The lack of innovation and risk averse nature of technology providers.
  • The lack of data standardization and resulting data mining capabilities.
  • The lack of quality-centric economics.
  • The limited communication with physicians and patients.

9. What is the field’s biggest obstacle?

The disproportionate power in the hands of academic providers and the lack of innovation among technology producers.

10. If you could give the radiology specialty one piece of advice, what would it be?

Focus on improved quality and communication and the rest will take care of itself.

Is there someone in the imaging community that you want to hear from? E-mail us their name and we'll ask them 10 questions.

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