7T MR excels in MS detection

October 1, 2007

Armed with better signal-to-noise ratios and advantageous relaxation values, 7T MR imaging enables much better visualization of the most common type of multiple sclerosis lesions and could pave the way for earlier detection of the disease, according to research from Ohio State University.

Armed with better signal-to-noise ratios and advantageous relaxation values, 7T MR imaging enables much better visualization of the most common type of multiple sclerosis lesions and could pave the way for earlier detection of the disease, according to research from Ohio State University.

In making earlier diagnosis possible, 7T MR could one day expand therapeutic options and help halt disease progression, according to Dr. Steffen Sammett, a research scientist.

Sammett demonstrated the value of 3T and 7T in visualizing MS lesions in a postmortem formalin-fixed brain in an exhibit at the 2007 American Roentgen Ray Society meeting. All images were taken on the whole-body Achieva unit from Philips Medical Systems.

Brain and spinal imaging are now typically performed on 1.5T MR units. Sammett's research showed that both 3T and 7T imaging allowed better visualization of the common cortical lesions, which often are missed with conventional MR. Furthermore, many lesions were seen on 7T but not on 3T images.

Spin-echo images taken on 3T and 7T units also allowed visualization of cortical MS plaques. Again, the best visualization occurred at 7T.