CO2, gadolinium prove utility in uterine fibroids treatment

November 1, 2007

Carbon dioxide and gadolinium are safe and effective contrast media for uterine artery embolization, according to a study from Johns Hopkins University. Their use provides an alternative for patients who are allergic to conventional iodinated contrast agents, and low doses reduce the risk of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis.

Carbon dioxide and gadolinium are safe and effective contrast media for uterine artery embolization, according to a study from Johns Hopkins University. Their use provides an alternative for patients who are allergic to conventional iodinated contrast agents, and low doses reduce the risk of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis.

Dr. Hyun S. Kim, an assistant professor of radiology at Hopkins, and colleagues evaluated the technique in eight patients with symptomatic fibroids. The patients underwent angiography after injection of about 30 to 40 mL of CO2 using a commercially available microcatheter system. They then received the embolization agent mixed with a low dose of the gadolinium-based contrast agent. This approach worked safely and effectively as contrast media in this group of patients, without major complications (J Vasc Interv Radiol 2007;18 [8]:1021-1027).