CT speed spurs display dialogue

December 1, 2006

The 64-slice CT scanner at Boston University Medical Center has made a significant impact on trauma cases. The speed of postprocessing has led to an increase in the use of MSCT for preoperative evaluation and a decrease in using plain x-ray or even relying on axial images, according to Dr. Alexander Norbash, radiology chair, speaking at the 2006 Stanford Multidetector-Row CT meeting.

The 64-slice CT scanner at Boston University Medical Center has made a significant impact on trauma cases. The speed of postprocessing has led to an increase in the use of MSCT for preoperative evaluation and a decrease in using plain x-ray or even relying on axial images, according to Dr. Alexander Norbash, radiology chair, speaking at the 2006 Stanford Multidetector-Row CT meeting.

Speed and resolution may have expanded the range of diagnostic options possible with CT, but the display technology is at least as important, Norbash said.

He posits that radiologists need to rethink interpretation methodologies when it comes to the large data sets created by 64-slice CT.

"We need to move toward an understanding of what data streams to import and of what will tangibly give us an understanding of the underlying anatomy," he said. "Some type of visualization methodology that explores the psychology of how we diagnose using these images is going to be integral to the growth of the technology."