Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced CT Detects More Colorectal Liver Metastasis

October 19, 2018

The contrast-enhanced CT also improves lesion conspicuity over standard care of monophasic portovenous CT.

Dynamic contrast-enhanced CT increased the detection of colorectal liver metastasis, especially for lesions smaller than 15 mm, according to a study published in the European Journal of Radiology.

Researchers from Belgium performed a prospective study to evaluate a dynamic contrast-enhanced CT-protocol and compare this method with standard of care monophasic portovenous CT for detection of colorectal liver metastases.

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A total of 135 treatment-naïve patients participated in the study. All underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced CT, followed by routine monophasic portovenous CT of thorax-abdomen-pelvis. Forty-two of the patients presented with liver metastasis. The number and lesion conspicuity of detected liver metastasis on dynamic contrast-enhanced CT using perfusion maps was compared to monophasic CT.

The results showed that dynamic contrast-enhanced CT outperformed portovenous CT for detection as well as conspicuity of colorectal liver metastasis, at a relatively low dose increment.

The researchers concluded that using dynamic contrast-enhanced CT increased the detection of colorectal liver metastasis, especially for lesions smaller than 15 mm, when compared to monophasic portovenous CT. Dynamic contrast-enhanced CT also has the added advantage of improved lesion conspicuity, which can positively influence reader confidence and clinical workflow.