FDA clears ADAC's coincidence detection

December 13, 1995

Nuclear medicine vendor ADAC Laboratories of Milpitas, CA, gota helping hand from the Food and Drug Administration at this year'sRadiological Society of North America meeting. The agency clearedADAC's 510(k) application for its molecular coincidence

Nuclear medicine vendor ADAC Laboratories of Milpitas, CA, gota helping hand from the Food and Drug Administration at this year'sRadiological Society of North America meeting. The agency clearedADAC's 510(k) application for its molecular coincidence detection(MCD) technique just days before the Chicago conference.

MCD enables nuclear medicine physicians to image high-energyPET radioisotopes like fluorodeoxyglucose without the use of heavycollimators (SCAN 6/21/95). ADAC is bullish on the technology,which it believes will lead to increased applications in nuclearmedicine. The company is sponsoring a multicenter trial startingearly next year to validate the clinical utility of MCD, accordingto Ian Farmer, vice president of marketing.

Several other nuclear medicine vendors are developing coincidencedetection techniques, but ADAC believes it has an 18 to 24-monthlead on its competitors in bringing a product to market, Farmersaid.

In other ADAC news, the company last month acquired JD TechnicalServices of Washington, MO, a gamma camera service and refurbishingfirm. The $1.7 million acquisition enables ADAC to refurbish andsell cameras made by other vendors. The company will also be thecornerstone of ADAC's new multivendor gamma camera service program,according to Farmer (see story, page 5).