Long-term data confirm stenting's cognitive benefit

April 1, 2007

For the first time, long-term data show sustained cognitive improvement at one year in patients who have undergone carotid stenting, according to a report from the 2007 International Symposium on Endovascular Therapy.

For the first time, long-term data show sustained cognitive improvement at one year in patients who have undergone carotid stenting, according to a report from the 2007 International Symposium on Endovascular Therapy. What's more interesting is that many asymptomatic patients in the study also showed improved cognitive functions following stenting.

This finding has led investigators to question the very notion of labeling these patients who are asymptomatic. The government currently reimburses only for symptomatic patients undergoing carotid stenting, according to Dr. Rodney Raabe, an interventional radiologist with Inland Vascular Institute in Spokane, WA.

"Symptomatic carotid stenosis may need to be redefined in the future to include functional deficits," Raabe said. "Perhaps potential neurocognitive improvement will be considered in carotid stenosis treatment."