Multislice CT and 3T MR abstracts dominate RSNA meeting

November 21, 2007

Of the 6000 scientific abstracts submitted to the RSNA this year, four major areas stand out, according to Dr. Gerald Dodd III, chair of the RSNA’s scientific program committee.

Of the 6000 scientific abstracts submitted to the RSNA this year, four major areas stand out, according to Dr. Gerald Dodd III, chair of the RSNA's scientific program committee.

Dodd cited the four dominant themes:

  • multislice CT applications throughout the body
  • different MR imaging techniques, including 3T
  • continued development of minimally invasive oncologic therapies
  • molecular imaging, including benchside and bedside applications

Still, the overall number of molecular imaging papers is small compared with other categories, as this is only the second year the RSNA has had this section. Current topics of interest in molecular imaging include hyperpolarized carbon-13 imaging, smart MR agents, and use of PET/CT of all forms with new radiotracers.

Cardiovascular studies jumped by 20%, mostly in CT, but with slight increases in cardiac MR as well, Dodd said. Research in cardiac CT includes better visualization of instent stenosis, the impact of extracardiac findings, and emergency room use of the triple rule-out.Given the positive results of the American College of Radiology Imaging Network trial on breast MR in high-risk women, it's no surprise that this topic will be well explored in the scientific sessions, along with breast ultrasound as an adjunct to mammography, according to Dodd. Tomosynthesis also gets its share of research space, in the breast as well as the chest.Ultrasound has seen a decline in submissions, especially by U.S. radiologists, over the years. It seems, though, that ultrasound research is integrated into the organ systems by subspecialists such as musculoskeletal and abdominal radiologists. This is the first year that ultrasound is not listed as a separate scientific category.With the excitement of a major ACRIN trial behind it, CT colonography continues to be a hot topic. Researchers are particularly looking at ways to standardize reporting and use computer-aided detection effectively. There will be a workshop dedicated to exploring aspects of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, as well as a number of scientific presentations on the topic.As in the past, the number of international submissions has increased, while the North American submissions have remained stable. The largest jump came from China.