NVIDIA unveils high-speed processors

August 5, 2009

Other headlinesLSU picks RIS/PACS from GETeleradiology firm rises in Singapore

NVIDIA unveils high-speed processors
Electronic components developer NVIDIA has released a scalable family of high-performance processors to run software that generates 3D models and analyzes large volumes of data. The Quadro Plex visual computing platforms can power a wide range of ultra-high resolution and multi-channel systems from desktop computers to visualization walls and network operations centers. The company is framing the new processors as providing a “massive leap” in computing power with “plug-and-play simplicity at one tenth the cost.”  By connecting two Quadro Plex systems to a single workstation, users can view images at a resolution of 36 megapixels, span visuals across two 4K projectors or eight auto-synchronized displays, and drive stereoscopic 3D content. The processors are available from NVIDIA partners, such as Cyviz and IGI, which specialize in designing and deploying state-of-the-art collaboration and visualization centers worldwide. Street price starts at $10,750 for a single Quadro Plex system.

Teleradiology firm rises in Singapore
Lion City Radiology will use 3D visualization software from Shina Systems to expand services among teleradiology clients in southeast Asia. The Singapore-based firm has entered into a multi-user 3D software licensing contract to use Shina Systems’ 3Di software, a web-based platform that runs on any PC. The 3Di software enables 3D viewing of images, CT coronary segmentation and reconstructions, coronary angiogram comparison with CT images, and virtual endoscopy. Lion City Radiology provides
radiology consultation, staffing and interpretation services at 25 locations in Singapore, Malaysia,
Indonesia, and UAE.

LSU picks RIS/PACS from GE
The Louisiana State University (LSU) Health System will deploy an integrated RIS, PACS and diagnostic reporting system from GE Healthcare across its ten public hospitals and more than 500 outpatient clinics. The $12.5 million contract, which will create a filmless and paperless central database and radiology image repository, is the first major building block of the LSU statewide electronic health record system, according to Dr. Fred Cerise, LSU System vice president for health affairs and medical education. Installation of the Centricity RIS/PACS will begin in late August. The state-wide system is expected to be live at all ten hospitals within one year.