Radiologic Technologists See Slow Salary Growth

July 22, 2013
Diagnostic Imaging Staff

The average salaries of radiologic technologists rose by only 1.7 percent in the last three years - a far slower growth than in previous periods.

The average salaries of radiologic technologists rose by only 1.7 percent in the last three years - a far slower growth than in previous periods.

The average salary is now $62,763, according to the 2013 American Society of Radiologic Technologists Wage and Salary Survey.

Over the last nine years, RT salary grew by more than 20 percent, ASRT has found. This represents about 2.28 percent per year, with the largest growth occurring between 2004 and 2007 during which salaries rose 12.6 percent.

“The slowing wage growth between 2010 and 2013 seems to be a reflection of the larger economy as the country continues to recover from the recession,” ASRT chief academic officer Myke Kudlas, MEd, RT(R)(QM), CIIP, said in a statement. “Economic data show that wages have been stagnant for many American workers during the past few years. RTs aren’t immune to that trend, even though we saw modest gains in several medical imaging practice areas.”

The survey also found:

  • Mammographers experienced the largest average gains at 8 percent, up to $65,101 in 2013 from $60,263 in 2010.
  • Magnetic resonance technologists saw a 5 percent increase, with salaries moving to $68,384 from $65,098.
  • Computed tomography technologists experienced a 4.9 percent increase to $63,454.
  • Cardiovascular-interventional technologists saw a 4.3 percent increase to $67,379.

Two disciplines saw slight wage decreases: Radiation therapists experienced a 0.7 percent decrease to $78,602, and radiographers experienced an average 0.5 percent decrease to $53,680 in 2013.

Despite the slow growth in wages, nearly 53 percent of respondents reported being very satisfied or satisfied with their pay. However, 42 percent of respondents said they were in relatively the same position as they were in 2010. A total of 10,639 radiologic technologists in 50 states and Washington, DC, completed the survey.
 

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