RSNA adds, subtracts, and morphs ideas to stay a step ahead of trends

November 1, 2006

All too soon, hordes of radiology aficionados will descend upon Chicago for the RSNA meeting. While we will cover the event via our annual Webcast, I'd like to mention some new features of the meeting that parallel evolving trends and our coverage.

All too soon, hordes of radiology aficionados will descend upon Chicago for the RSNA meeting. While we will cover the event via our annual Webcast, I'd like to mention some new features of the meeting that parallel evolving trends and our coverage.

One telling change is the disappearance of infoRAD as a separate exhibit. Informatics is now ready for prime time, and all such presentations will be folded into the regular program.

The growing acceptance of imaging modalities working in concert rather than competition has sparked the creation of subspecialty communities. Each subspecialty, such as cardiac imaging, occupies a spoke emanating from two central hubs where colleagues can view scientific posters and educational exhibits on large screens.

The success of last year's interventional oncology symposium (running again this year) has spawned similar symposia in pediatric and emergency radiology. These also integrate science and education. A first-time MRI case-based review maxed out at 1000 registrants and has been moved to a larger venue. The debut of a radiology assistants' program also maxed out and had to be relocated.

Lecture topics reflect important developments, and this year they include quality improvement, image-guided cancer treatment, cardiac imaging, radiation dose optimization, and functional imaging in radiation oncology.

Our coverage in Diagnostic Imaging is on the cutting edge of important trends. This issue is no different, as many articles reflect the strategic changes at the RSNA meeting. They include developments in teleradiology, optimizing 3T MRI, microsphere therapy, radiologist extenders, and multimodality cardiac imaging.

Stay with us in Chicago as we continue to uncover the most interesting and important scientific studies in radiology today.

-Mr. Kaiser is news editor of Diagnostic Imaging.