Smokers kick the habit after seeing CT images

July 1, 2005

Patients who had a series of abnormal lung CT scans were more likely to abstain from smoking and to remain smoke-free after three years than those with fewer abnormal scans, according to a study published in the May 15 issue of Cancer.

Patients who had a series of abnormal lung CT scans were more likely to abstain from smoking and to remain smoke-free after three years than those with fewer abnormal scans, according to a study published in the May 15 issue of Cancer.

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, conducted a longitudinal study of current and former smokers. Among patients who had an abnormal exam in each of three years, 41.9% reported smoking abstinence. Cessation rates decreased with fewer abnormal exams.

Several factors contributed to smoking abstinence among baseline smokers: older age, worse baseline pulmonary function, and previous-year abnormal CT exam.