Consistent screen checks boost image quality

December 1, 2005

A consistent approach to calibrating the many monitors used throughout a hospital for image viewing can lead to more efficient image review and help identify monitors that may need to be replaced, according to researchers in Canada. The method developed by researchers at the University Health Network in Ontario uses an inexpensive calibration protocol (J Digit Imaging 2005;[Epub ahead of print]).

A consistent approach to calibrating the many monitors used throughout a hospital for image viewing can lead to more efficient image review and help identify monitors that may need to be replaced, according to researchers in Canada. The method developed by researchers at the University Health Network in Ontario uses an inexpensive calibration protocol (J Digit Imaging 2005;[Epub ahead of print]).

The protocol involves cleaning the monitor, setting the appropriate minimum and maximum luminance, setting the display system to the DICOM 14 gray-scale standard display function to compensate for the nonlinearity of the human ocular motor response, and performing visual checks.

Researchers reported improved image quality after calibration. Zero to 5% luminance difference was discernable on 30% of display systems before calibration. The difference was discernable on 100% of systems after calibration. Using the protocol, they also discovered that about 50% of the displays did not have the maximum luminance set.