'DC bureau' brings readers fresh perspective from nation's capital

August 1, 2007

I had been working in San Francisco since I joined Diagnostic Imaging in 2001. I lived close to family and friends and enjoyed the cultural vibrancy of a city known for its live-and-let-live mentality and breathtaking landscapes. I was close to Silicon Valley and to universities conducting pioneering imaging research. But, in many ways, I was far from where political junkies say the action really is.

I had been working in San Francisco since I joined Diagnostic Imaging in 2001. I lived close to family and friends and enjoyed the cultural vibrancy of a city known for its live-and-let-live mentality and breathtaking landscapes. I was close to Silicon Valley and to universities conducting pioneering imaging research. But, in many ways, I was far from where political junkies say the action really is.

A few months ago, I landed in Washington, DC. That means I am now in the middle of breaking news and other key events that affect radiology and radiologists. For the first time, I have been able to bring to Diagnostic Imaging's readers a firsthand account of many scientific meetings taking place in and around the nation's capital. That includes those organized by several universities, government, and imaging-related institutions headquartered in the area.

Take for instance this year's National Council on Radiation Protection meeting, which highlighted the increasing exposure of patients to medical radiation. Despite the significance of these reports for the radiology community and the public at large, most media ignored this meeting. Diagnostic Imaging has always reported on safety issues, but being able to cover the NCRP live brought radiation protection into a tighter focus for our readers. Another example is the 2007 SNM meeting. Attending presentations like Dr. Henry N. Wagner Jr.'s annual highlights lecture gave me a broader understanding of the role molecular imaging will play in the future of radiology. You can see why and how in this month's pages.

While I miss the majesty of Big Sur, I enjoy my proximity to Big Government, which allows us to report on developments in radiology that might otherwise escape media notice.

H. A. Abella is associate editor of Diagnostic Imaging.