ECR places molecular imaging under intense scrutiny

February 18, 2005

Radiologists who are struggling to develop a basic understanding of the complex fields of molecular imaging and nanotechnology may benefit from attending the European Congress of Radiology, to be held in Vienna from 4 to 8 March.

Radiologists who are struggling to develop a basic understanding of the complex fields of molecular imaging and nanotechnology may benefit from attending the European Congress of Radiology, to be held in Vienna from 4 to 8 March.

A three-session primer course will explain what molecular imaging actually is and how it may transform clinical practice in the years ahead. Lectures will cover imaging of cell migration and gene expression, as well as targeted MR contrast agents and parametric and molecular MR techniques.

The nanotechnology session, scheduled for the morning of Saturday, 5 March, will address the basic tools and concepts of the technology, its links with imaging, and its wider implications for medicine and health.

Another new element of the scientific program is a categorical course detailing the essentials of neuroradiology. Discussion will center on ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, cerebral tumors and infections, epilepsy, and craniocerebral and spinal trauma, among other topics.

"This area was chosen because ECR is mainly a congress for general radiologists who became aware of neuroradiology only when a CT unit was installed in their hospital," said Prof. Antonio Chiesa, president of ECR 2005 and director of radiology at the University of Brescia, Italy. "Furthermore, a practical approach to neuroradiological problems is needed by the majority of young radiologists to update their knowledge and experience."

Four sessions jointly organized by the ECR and the European Association of Radiology will be introduced at this year's congress. They will focus on standardization of training programs in Europe, assessment and accreditation in radiology, the opportunities and threats posed by teleradiology, and the European research network in biomedical imaging.

The total number of abstract submissions was 4151, of which 2010 were accepted (934 scientific papers, 649 scientific exhibits, and 427 educational exhibits). The largest number of accepted abstracts were in interventional radiology (206), followed by musculoskeletal (201), neuroradiology (194), genitourinary (169), gastrointestinal tract (161), chest (145), abdominal viscera (145), vascular (130), cardiac (130), and breast (117).

More details on ECR 2005 are available at www.ecr.org. For daily news on the congress, you can visit our Webcast at diagnosticimaging.com.