Global imaging company acts locally with free mammography

May 17, 2007

Fujifilm worked with two national humanitarian organizations to keep its pledge to socially responsible business practices with an unusual Mother’s Day gift to 27 New York City women: free mammography screening.

Fujifilm worked with two national humanitarian organizations to keep its pledge to socially responsible business practices with an unusual Mother's Day gift to 27 New York City women: free mammography screening.

The event took place on May 7 at PS 149 Sojourner Truth School in Harlem. The company and the National Breast Cancer Foundation, a nonprofit organization based in Dallas, funded the mammograms. A mobile mammography unit provided by the American-Italian Cancer Foundation carried out the exams.

Fujifilm's effort was part of its public education campaign, Images of Health: Mammograms for a Million Moms, launched in October 2006. The company also donated $2500 to the elementary school's art program and promised to give $2500 more to the institution in return for the same number of pledge cards from women in the community who wish to undergo mammography screening.

Although these women recognize the importance of early breast cancer detection, many may never get the test done. Mothers and grandmothers of PS 149 students and other women throughout the neighborhood were thrilled to get a chance to receive a potentially life-saving exam, said LeShawn Hodge, a school parent coordinator. The school is named after the feminist abolitionist and former slave famous for her "Ain't I a Woman?" speech delivered at a women's convention in Ohio in 1851.

Kerry Kalinski, a spokesperson for Fujifilm Medical Systems USA, noted that Harlem is among several U.S. communities with the highest rates of breast cancer mortality. The national average mortality rate is 26 out of 100,000 women. Recent studies show that rate to be 37 and 32 per 100,000 for women of Central and East Harlem, respectively.

Fujifilm's campaign also provides the National Breast Cancer Foundation with funding for mammography screening to women in need nationwide. A percentage of Fujifilm's pink QuickSnap 800 disposable camera sales goes to the NBCF. To date, the charitable organization has received more than $20,000 from camera sales, $300,000 in direct contributions, and two digital mammography systems from Fuji.

For more information from the Diagnostic Imaging archives:

Web tool bolsters mammography screening rates

Digital mammography hits mainstream use

Mobile digital mammography scans stack up to film images

Netherlands group rolls out mobile digital mammography pilot