Kodak markets two DR systems using collaborative technology

October 25, 2000

Eastman Kodak has finally begun marketing two new digital radiography (DR) systems it introduced at the last RSNA meeting. The products are the result of collaborations Kodak worked out a year ago with Analogic, Hologic, and Fischer Imaging.Both systems

Eastman Kodak has finally begun marketing two new digital radiography (DR) systems it introduced at the last RSNA meeting. The products are the result of collaborations Kodak worked out a year ago with Analogic, Hologic, and Fischer Imaging.

Both systems have amorphous selenium detectors developed by Hologic's Direct Radiography Corp. (DRC) subsidiary.

The primary Kodak system is the ceiling-mounted DirectView DR 9000, which has a rotating U-arm for general radiology and is targeted at customers installing new x-ray rooms or converting to digital. It comes with a choice of three patient support tables and will list at $435,000.

Kodak's DirectView DR 5000 is a digital bucky system on a floor-mounted tube stand for chest and other upright exams. Its cost is $375,000. Both systems use Hologic operator consoles.

X-ray and ancillary hardware for the two systems comes from Fischer Imaging. Analogic, which is reportedly developing its own flat-panel detector, is the primary contractor doing final assembly for Kodak but will not be marketing these systems under its own name, said Jane Hasselkus, Kodak's worldwide category manager for DR.

As part of a strategic alliance just announced with R2 Technology, Kodak plans to integrate R2 CAD software into its CR and DR systems. The companies intend to work together to develop new CAD applications, including the ability to identify regions of interest in lung fields.

"As soon as we can develop the technology, we will use it," Pugh said.

Fischer has installed several DR units that are virtually the same under its own brand in Europe and North America (SCAN, 4/26/00).

Kodak is also offering the DR 7100 retrofit for customers that have fairly new x-ray generators, Hasselkus said.

"We have an option (that type of customer) could integrate into their existing x-ray system," Hasselkus said.

Kodak announced these systems at last year's RSNA show, where the company said it expected to have them available by the second quarter of 2000 (SCAN, 1/12/00).

"The delay was not due to product development issues," Hasselkus said. "We are building a whole new value delivery system to sell, service, and support the DR program. This took slightly longer to finalize, but we feel the delay is warranted so that we can ensure customer satisfaction."