Norland gets clearance for Apollo

June 10, 1998

Ultrasound-based bone densitometers may be attracting the most attention in the market, but investment continues in traditional dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) systems. One company that follows this philosophy is White Plains, NY-based Norland

Ultrasound-based bone densitometers may be attracting the most attention in the market, but investment continues in traditional dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) systems. One company that follows this philosophy is White Plains, NY-based Norland Medical Systems, which has received Food and Drug Administration 510(k) clearance for its low-cost Apollo DXA.

Apollo DXA is a heel-scanning system that will sell for less than $20,000. It features a scan time of under 15 seconds and can be operated from a hand-held control console. A laptop computer and a black-and-white inkjet printer are available as options with Apollo DXA.

Norland officially introduced Apollo DXA at the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists meeting last month in New Orleans, where the company also demonstrated its Paris ultrasound-based densitometer. Sales of Paris are already under way outside the U.S., and the company expects to receive FDA approval of its premarket approval application by the fall.

In other company news, Norland's financial results continue to reflect the uncertainty in the U.S. bone densitometry market (SCAN 4/1/98). In its first quarter (end-March), Norland's revenues dipped 52.4% to $2.1 million, compared with $4.3 million reported in the same period last year. The company posted a net loss of $1.9 million, compared with net income of $104,000 in 1997.

Norland is seeing an improvement in second-quarter product sales, however, and also believes that a recently announced deal with Tokai Financial Services will help spur stronger financial results. Tokai, based in Berwyn, PA, will provide product financing for U.S. purchasers of Norland's x-ray bone densitometers.