Obama health reform plan continues to lead in DiagnosticImaging.com survey

October 28, 2008

Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama's health plan continues to hold a lead over the plan put forth by Republican John McCain in a survey being conducted at DiagnosticImaging.com.

Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama's health plan continues to hold a lead over the plan put forth by Republican John McCain in a survey being conducted at DiagnosticImaging.com.

As of midday Oct. 27, the survey had received 380 votes. Obama's plan was favored by 44.7% and McCain's by 42.1% of respondents, a slight gain for McCain from a week earlier. Another 6.1% favored a different plan, 5% favored no plan, and 2.1% were undecided. If you haven't voted already, you can still cast your ballot.

The survey was posted on Oct. 7 and is scheduled to run until the Nov. 4 election. The poll is an unscientific snapshot of site visitor opinion. Though prone to sampling bias, it is structured to prevent multiple votes from individual sources. Final results will be reported at DiagnosticImaging.com.

In an identical survey at CancerNetwork.com, a site run by two oncology publications under the same corporate banner as Diagnostic Imaging, there had been 65 votes cast. The Obama plan led with 57% of the respondents, compared with 18% for the McCain plan. Nine percent favored another plan, 2% favored no plan, and 14% were undecided.

A survey at The New England Journal of Medicine site found that respondents considered healthcare reform very important, but they showed less support for the Obama or McCain plans.

Eighty-four percent considered healthcare reform very important, 13% considered it somewhat important, and 3% considered it not important. Obama's plan clearly bested McCain's plan, 34% to 19%, but both lagged neither plan at 47%. The survey was closed Sept. 3 with 2470 respondents.

For more information from the Diagnostic Imaging archives:
Radiology searches for place in healthcare reform puzzle McCain emphasizes market-driven reform Candidates poke at gorilla of health reform, but can they tame it?