• AI
  • Molecular Imaging
  • CT
  • X-Ray
  • Ultrasound
  • MRI
  • Facility Management
  • Mammography

OBGYN Practices Refuse Obese Patients. Should You?

Article

Some obstetricians are turning away obese patient, wary of the higher risk of complications and about the safety of patients on their exam tables. Radiology struggles with similar issues. Is it time to set limits?

Some obstetricians are turning away obese patient, wary of the higher risk of complications and about the safety of patients on their exam tables.

According to a recent article in South Florida's Sun Sentinel, 15 out of 105 OBGYN practices polled by the paper have set weight cut-offs for patients.

Certainly, obesity is a concern for radiologists, too. Quality can be compromised when imaging obese patients, whether in X-Ray, CT or MRI.  Plus, some patients simply can't fit into standard equipment, creating workflow problems and questions about when to invest in newer, larger apeture equipment. Toshiba, GE, Seimens and others all have released equipment with larger apetures and made to support heavier patients.

A 2004 study reviewed radiology reports filed between 1989 and 2003 that were labeled as "limited by body habitus," meaning limited in quality due to the patient's size. The percentage of limited reports nearly doubled over the 15-year period, from 0.10 percent in 1989 to 0.19 percent in 2003. As the population grew more obese, imaging problems grew, too. And obesity is certainly an even bigger factor now than it was in 2003.

New research is being done on how to improve quality imaging for obese patients, including this study about forgoing contrast agents in appendix CT scans of patients with abdominal girth of  105 cm or more.

While research and evelopment continues, radiology practices are left making hard decisions about risk and investments.

Does your practice limit obese patients? And where do you set the limit?

 

Related Videos
Emerging Research at SNMMI Examines 18F-flotufolastat in Managing Primary and Recurrent Prostate Cancer
Could Pluvicto Have a Role in Taxane-Naïve mCRPC?: An Interview with Oliver Sartor, MD
New SNMMI President Cathy Cutler, PhD, Discusses Current Challenges and Goals for Nuclear Medicine
Where the USPSTF Breast Cancer Screening Recommendations Fall Short: An Interview with Stacy Smith-Foley, MD
A Closer Look at MRI-Guided Transurethral Ultrasound Ablation for Intermediate Risk Prostate Cancer
Improving the Quality of Breast MRI Acquisition and Processing
Can Fiber Optic RealShape (FORS) Technology Provide a Viable Alternative to X-Rays for Aortic Procedures?
Does Initial CCTA Provide the Best Assessment of Stable Chest Pain?
Making the Case for Intravascular Ultrasound Use in Peripheral Vascular Interventions
Can Diffusion Microstructural Imaging Provide Insights into Long Covid Beyond Conventional MRI?
Related Content
© 2024 MJH Life Sciences

All rights reserved.