• AI
  • Molecular Imaging
  • CT
  • X-Ray
  • Ultrasound
  • MRI
  • Facility Management
  • Mammography

Report from SIR: Carotid stenting improves cognition

Article

A study by private practice researchers found that carotid artery stenting can improve the thought process and memory skills even in patients without clear symptoms of stenosis.

A study by private practice researchers found that carotid artery stenting can improve the thought process and memory skills even in patients without clear symptoms of stenosis.

The study presented last week at the 2006 Society of Interventional Radiology meeting in Toronto validates two other studies published recently by investigators in the U.S. and Germany.

Carotid artery stenting has become a widely accepted procedure for stroke prevention in high-risk patients. What researchers didn't know is that blood flow improvement after stenting also seems to make people's brains work better, said principal investigator Dr. Rodney D. Raabe, director of interventional radiology at the Inland Vascular Institute of Spokane, WA.

"Patients' memory and other cognitive functions improved. Some of them even say they see colors brighter," Raabe said.

Raabe and colleagues have prospectively assessed 51 symptomatic and asymptomatic patients treated with carotid artery stenting. The patients underwent five neurocognitive function tests that assess memory, attention, and depression at least one day before and one or two days after treatment. The study protocol provides for additional cognitive follow-up at three, six, and 12 months.

To date, 39 and 30 patients have completed three-month and six-month follow-ups, respectively. All patients underwent diagnostic angiography before and diffusion-weighted MRI after stenting. Findings show that patients with narrowed carotid arteries had neurocognitive deficits involving memory and other cognitive functions. These deficits improved after carotid artery stenting.

Stroke prevention remains the sole indication for treatment with carotid artery stenting. The accumulating new evidence suggests the potential neurocognitive benefit should be considered in future studies.

"These findings could potentially change the way carotid disease is treated in the U.S. and Europe," Raabe said.

Recent Videos
Emerging Research at SNMMI Examines 18F-flotufolastat in Managing Primary and Recurrent Prostate Cancer
Could Pluvicto Have a Role in Taxane-Naïve mCRPC?: An Interview with Oliver Sartor, MD
New SNMMI President Cathy Cutler, PhD, Discusses Current Challenges and Goals for Nuclear Medicine
Where the USPSTF Breast Cancer Screening Recommendations Fall Short: An Interview with Stacy Smith-Foley, MD
A Closer Look at MRI-Guided Transurethral Ultrasound Ablation for Intermediate Risk Prostate Cancer
Improving the Quality of Breast MRI Acquisition and Processing
Can Fiber Optic RealShape (FORS) Technology Provide a Viable Alternative to X-Rays for Aortic Procedures?
Does Initial CCTA Provide the Best Assessment of Stable Chest Pain?
Making the Case for Intravascular Ultrasound Use in Peripheral Vascular Interventions
Can Diffusion Microstructural Imaging Provide Insights into Long Covid Beyond Conventional MRI?
Related Content
© 2024 MJH Life Sciences

All rights reserved.