RF ablation takes on lung lesions

July 1, 2001

Already established in the liver and kidneys, radio-frequency ablation has shown early promise as a treatment for unresectable lung tumors. One of the first studies on the technique, presented by Korean researchers in May at the American Roentgen Ray Society meeting, found high mortality from the procedure but few complications among patients who responded well. In 19 patients with unresectable lung cancer ranging from stage Ib to IV, eight patients remained alive at six months of follow-up. The research team achieved complete ablation in 30% of patients, using internally cooled RF needles delivering 150 watts for 20 to 40 minutes.

Already established in the liver and kidneys, radio-frequency ablation has shown early promise as a treatment for unresectable lung tumors. One of the first studies on the technique, presented by Korean researchers in May at the American Roentgen Ray Society meeting, found high mortality from the procedure but few complications among patients who responded well. In 19 patients with unresectable lung cancer ranging from stage Ib to IV, eight patients remained alive at six months of follow-up. The research team achieved complete ablation in 30% of patients, using internally cooled RF needles delivering 150 watts for 20 to 40 minutes.