Two new features in magazine reflect need to expand skills

April 1, 2007

As radiologists, you face a constantly changing clinical world. You're asked to maintain a high level of expertise in ever-evolving technology and in the latest evidence-based medicine.

"There are many ways of going forward, but only one way of standing still."
-Franklin D. Roosevelt

As radiologists, you face a constantly changing clinical world. You're asked to maintain a high level of expertise in ever-evolving technology and in the latest evidence-based medicine. You're not alone in this journey. We, too, strive to stay informed and present relevant details to you with appropriate hindsight and foresight.

As we've done in the past, Diagnostic Imaging is responding to the changing world of radiology by forging ahead with you. In this issue, you'll find two new features to help you stay on the clinical cutting edge, as well as hone your interpretation skills, in a quick-read format.

In "Clinical Advances," we seek out clinical procedures that are just shy of reaching routine mainstream use. These are applications anecdotally proven by early adopters, as well as those gaining peer-reviewed strength. Most of all, they are ideas you need to know about.

In "Case of the Month," we find experts who will dig into their vast wealth of imaging files and share them with you. The clinical images-whether neuro, cardiovascular, or body from CT, MRI, or ultrasound-are sure to challenge and enlighten you.

Our inaugural Clinical Advances segment details the clinical importance of including CT angiography and CT perfusion in the initial evaluation of stroke. The Case of the Month highlights mesenteric findings on multislice CT enterography. Both, we hope, will add to your overall body of knowledge.

-Mr. Kaiser is news editor of Diagnostic Imaging.