Philips MultiTransmit adjusts radiofrequency to patient anatomy

June 1, 2009

Image quality derived from echo liver imaging at 3T (A, left) improves (A, right) when applying Philips MultiTransmit technology, which eliminatesdielectric shading, an artifact commonly found at this field strength.

Image quality derived from echo liver imaging at 3T (A) improves when applying Philips MultiTransmit technology, which eliminates dielectric shading, an artifact commonly found at this field strength. Unveiled at RSNA 2008, MultiTransmit technology automatically adjusts multiple radiofrequency signals to accommodate the anatomy of specific patients, thereby improving image uniformity and increasing overall image consistency, according to the company. The technology, which is unique to the company’s Achieva 3.0T TX, is particularly helpful in patients with liver cirrhosis and ascites (B). These ascites can be challenging to image due to shielding effects of fluids (B, inset). MultiTransmit solves the problem, decreasing B1 inhomogeneity and, thereby, improving lesion visualization. The first installations of the Achieva 3.0T TX with MultiTransmit began operating earlier this year at Tokai University in Tokyo, Bonn University in Germany, and Fletcher Allen Health Care in Burlington, VT. Users are focusing on breast, spine, and abdominal imaging. (Provided by University of Bonn)