Tips for relieving workstation strain

May 26, 2010
Diagnostic Imaging, Diagnostic Imaging Vol 32 No 5, Volume 32, Issue 5

From Mike Graham, healthcare territory manager for Anthro, a vendor of digital workstation furniture:

From Mike Graham, healthcare territory manager for Anthro, a vendor of digital workstation furniture:

• Radiologists should change positions throughout the day: sit, stand, and/or recline. Changing positions changes things. Even if you're sitting, you're still using your muscles to maintain the position.

• The monitor should be 22 to 24 inches away and at a 15º to 20º downward viewing angle from the center.

• The arms should be supported on the table, creating a 90º angle. The same relationship to the table should hold whether sitting or standing; the stomach should almost touch the table.

• The knees should rest at a 90º angle to the thighs and the floor and no pressure should be applied to the underside of the legs to ensure circulation is not restricted.

From Amir Rotlevi, vice president of AFC industries, another vendor of digital workstation furniture:

• A good workstation should permit the user to adjust multiple elements to suit his or her own size and preferences. The reading workstation must be adjustable to meet standards from the fifth-percentile seated woman (shortest) to the 95th-percentile standing man (tallest).

• A workstation should be flexible enough to keep the phone, input devices, and dictation systems within easy reach for all users to avoid straining, twisting, and stretching. Look for accessory mounts that enable versatile placement.

• Input devices also should be given careful consideration. Foot pedals, joysticks, ergonomic mice, and keyboards should all be designed to prevent radiologists from suffering repetitive motion injuries. If a mouse or keyboard is used, a wrist rest is advisable.

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