Imaging scientists back MR to detect ductal carcinoma

November 2, 2009

MRI, possibly employing higher field strengths and dedicated breast coils, should be used more often for detecting ductal carcinoma in situ, according to a panel convened by the National Institutes of Health.

MRI, possibly employing higher field strengths and dedicated breast coils, should be used more often for detecting ductal carcinoma in situ, according to a panel convened by the National Institutes of Health.

MRI is used for adjunct screening in women at high risk, but could gain significance when diagnosing DCIS, according to a Sept. 24 statement issued by the panel. The experts recommended looking at how higher field strength magnets and dedicated breast coils might improve detection. They also called for comparative effectiveness studies in individuals who do and do not undergo MRI. The comments came in a conference sponsored by the NIH and the National Cancer Institute.