Fuji enhances x-ray detector and portable system

November 29, 2010

Fuji Medical Systems USA outdid itself in portable x-ray twice this year at the RSNA meeting. The company unveiled a wireless version of the cabled portable x-ray detector it released earlier in the year. It also brought out a new version of its FCR Go, a portable x-ray system based on computed radiography, featuring an enhanced generator, full-size workstation, and improved drive subsystem for greater mobility.

Fuji Medical Systems USA outdid itself in portable x-ray twice this year at the RSNA meeting. The company unveiled a wireless version of the cabled portable x-ray detector it released earlier in the year. It also brought out a new version of its FCR Go, a portable x-ray system based on computed radiography, featuring an enhanced generator, full-size workstation, and improved drive subsystem for greater mobility.

On the solid-state detector side of the Fuji booth, company reps were talking up the new work-in-progress FDR D-EVO Wireless as being designed to provide all the benefits of a standard 14 x 17-inch cassette with the flexibility that accompanies wireless detectors. It has yet to clear the FDA, but when it does, the company expects to position the new detector as it has its cabled version, as a simple, workflow-oriented way to upgrade analog x-ray systems to digital.

For customers who need an immediate way to upgrade from film, Fuji is showing off the commercially available 14 x 17-inch detector that connects to radiography equipment through a cable. The cabled FDR D-EVO began shipping to U.S. sites in late August. Images are transmitted to the technologist’s workstation in as little as three seconds with nine-second cycle times between exposures.

Those who need the whole package-generator, tube, and detector-and need it on wheels are being shown Fuji’s new CR-based FCR Go2. The durability, flexibility, and ease of use afforded by CR makes the FCR Go2 a natural for portable x-ray exams done in the emergency department, operating room, intensive care, and other restricted settings where patient movement and detector fit are limited, according to Rob Fabrizio, a senior product manager in Fujifilm Modality Solutions.

The higher output x-ray generator better visualizes dense areas, such as the abdomen and spine, as well as bariatric patients, according to the company.