U.K.-based contract research organization invests in ultrasound

June 14, 2010

Synexus, a Manchester-based multinational company dedicated to the recruitment and running of clinical trials, has recently invested in Doppler ultrasound equipment for each of its seven U.K.-based dedicated research centers. After training for all Synexus’ doctors, the facilities are now being used as part of the drive to recruit patients to a new diabetes study.

Synexus, a Manchester-based multinational company dedicated to the recruitment and running of clinical trials, has recently invested in Doppler ultrasound equipment for each of its seven U.K.-based dedicated research centers. After training for all Synexus’ doctors, the facilities are now being used as part of the drive to recruit patients to a new diabetes study.

The Doppler equipment will be used to confirm a diagnosis of peripheral artery disease (PAD) in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Head of U.K. operations Angela Harnick believes it is essential for companies like Synexus to continue to invest in this type of diagnostic equipment.

“We are all acutely aware of the challenges in recruiting patients to U.K.-based studies quickly and cost-effectively,” she said. “As with our previous investment in DXA scanners, this one is designed to help us recruit the right patients as quickly as possible and to give our project team and investigators better control over volumes and timings.”

General practitioners in the U.K. do not generally have access to Doppler ultrasound and have to refer patients to a specialist consultant for the PAD test, which can involve a wait of several weeks before a confirmed diagnosis can be made and treatment started. For GPs working with Synexus to help recruit patients to this diabetes trial, they are able to offer the Doppler test within a matter of days.

Michael Fort, Synexus’ chief executive, is certain that continued investment in diagnostic equipment is vital to delivering clinical trials on time in the U.K.

“We need to take action that makes joining a clinical trial more attractive to patients, and we need to show GPs that we really can make a difference to their patients by delivering faster diagnoses and first class medical care while their patients are part of our studies,” he said. “At Synexus, we continue to buck the trend against clinical trials recruitment in the U.K. Since 2005 we have increased patients taking part in clinical trials here from one thousand to more than five thousand in 2009 and will continue to work to increase these numbers.”