Zonare launches ‘ultra’ upgrade at ECR

March 12, 2007

Buyers of Zonare Medical Systems’ latest iteration, the z.one ultra, will read images whose gain and brightness have been automatically adjusted using software advances. The same allows automatic spectral Doppler waveform tracing. Reader will be able to see the images as never before.

Buyers of Zonare Medical Systems' latest iteration, the z.one ultra, will read images whose gain and brightness have been automatically adjusted using software advances. The same allows automatic spectral Doppler waveform tracing. Reader will be able to see the images as never before.

The improved system, commercially launched this month and showcased at the European Congress of Radiology in Vienna, features a 19-inch diagonal screen built into a redesigned portable cart. The signature technology of this convertible ultrasound system offers the option of use as a cart or a hand-carried system when the lightweight unit is undocked. The cart has been tweaked as well, its trackball made smaller and more sensitive. The buttons of the most used functions have become larger.

"Rather than putting up just diagnostic information, we are addressing workflow in ways that really help streamline processes," said Glen McLaughlin, Ph.D., chief technology officer and vice president of engineering at Zonare.

The z.one ultra will begin shipping globally at the end of this month. Its newly minted Auto-opt algorithm adjusts for differences in the speed of the ultrasonic waves as they travel through different tissues of the body, thereby optimizing image gain and brightness.

Auto-Dop Trace software processes original Doppler data independent of spectral Doppler postprocessing parameters, such as gain and dynamic range, to create an accurate Doppler waveform with accompanying calculations updated each heartbeat or set time interval. The z.one ultra also includes compound harmonics, which combines fundamental and harmonic frequencies to improve penetration.

These capabilities are supported by a cart designed for ease of use and access, McLaughlin said. The large screen supports the display of high-resolution images and a modality work list networked to the hospital information system through a wireless connection.

The cart and docked ultrasound system run on battery for up to two and a half hours, he said.