Healthy Living for the Radiologist In Training

February 25, 2011

I am reminded of what my mentor in internship taught me about perfecting my craft. He believed that without achieving harmony in five different areas, it would be very difficult to excel professionally. Financial, emotional, social, physical, and spiritual health, he professed, were the foundations for maintaining a strong professional life. I agree.

As I sit here thinking of the content of this month's article, I am reminded of what my mentor in internship taught me about perfecting my craft. He believed that without achieving harmony in five different areas, it would be very difficult to excel professionally. Financial, emotional, social, physical, and spiritual health, he professed, were the foundations for maintaining a strong professional life. I agree.

However, the physical aspect of this pentad often becomes taken for granted in our busy, youthful lives because our health is usually the last to betray us. In order to keep it that way, I would like to invite you to explore some issues that daunt men every day with regards to health, fitness, and healthy eating in a modern society. This article will attempt to answer questions that we all have asked at some point or another.

If you are like me, a starving medical resident, and a lot of other people in the face of the current economic situation, you are looking to make some budget cuts. One of the first things people do is cut the gym membership, according to Money magazine. But what about your intense desire to balance the pentad? My friend, help is on the way. Even if you don’t have the latest Soloflex machine, you should be happy to know that there are plenty of opportunities for a thorough sans gym workout routine. Let’s take a look at some options:

1. Walking/ Jogging -- First, let’s not forget that walking is usually how most of us get around daily so we can incorporate this activity into our everyday lives. For instance, if you are a driver, try parking a block or two further from your destination everyday. If you ride the subway, try walking and not taking the bus to short destinations. Take the stairs – at least when you are going down a flight! Neighborhood walking or jogging is just as good as the treadmill and you can get a distance by using an online provider such as Google maps to design your course.

2. Fitness Equipment -- Now when I say fitness equipment, I am not trying to put a Soloflex back in your pool room/bedroom/living room (nothing against Soloflex). What I am talking about are very storable, affordable pieces like fitness balls to work on your abs, a fitness mat for those of us who have hard wood floors, dumbbells, and handle bars that can be mounted in doorways for pull-ups or placed on the floor for pushups. These are all small pieces that can add a variety to your workout to cut down on the monotony of doing what has to be done.

3. Hydration -- Let’s face it; we are going to get thirsty after 200 crunches and push-ups. We need to hydrate – and no better way to do it than a reusable water filter for your sink. These run anywhere from $20 to $80 and can be found in any drugstore. In addition to saving money on the latest athlete-sponsored water, they will also contribute to your green thumb in that you are able to use less plastic (Nader would be proud).

This is just a start. In my next post, I’ll outline a few ways to augment the regular workout and make reasonable diet modifications at home, work, and play.