Portable DR detectors proliferate at RSNA 2008

December 4, 2008

Flat-panel detectors designed to be pulled from one bucky and put into another -- or simply set upright or laid flat on patient tables -- redefined general radiography suites featured on the RSNA exhibit floor this year. They came from suppliers such as Trixell, Varian, and Canon. Some were wireless. Others bore cables with easy disconnects for quick relocation.

Flat-panel detectors designed to be pulled from one bucky and put into another -- or simply set upright or laid flat on patient tables -- redefined general radiography suites featured on the RSNA exhibit floor this year. They came from suppliers such as Trixell, Varian, and Canon. Some were wireless. Others bore cables with easy disconnects for quick relocation.

Siemens Healthcare featured a wireless detector built into its Ysio (easy-O) DR system. The general radiography system, shown as a work-in-progress at last year's RSNA meeting and now shipping to U.S. customers, can be configured with one or two detectors for table and wall stand. A key feature is fully automated and synchronized movements that can be programmed into some 500 discrete positions, according to the company.

Philips' work-in-progress Eleva Wireless is designed to support a completely cassette-free workflow through the use of a wireless flat-panel detector. The cable-free design, currently awaiting FDA clearance, will be applied first in the company's DigitalDiagnost radiography rooms, but it can be configured for use in ICU, trauma, or the operating room, according to Philips.

A new portable digital radiography system, MobileDaRT Evolution, was featured in the Shimadzu booth. Available in North America, the MobileDaRT Evolution is built for emergency and trauma departments. The premium system complements the Japanese company's mobile DR product, the MobileDaRT, which was introduced four years ago. This latest release operates without electric cabling and features an ergonomic design for quick positioning and maneuverability.

A portable computed radiography system, built by Fujifilm Medical Systems and cleared in spring by the FDA, is being delivered to U.S. customers. The product, FCR Go, shown at the Fuji booth, supports image review and reprocessing at its portable console after capturing radiographs on lightweight phosphor-based cassettes.