Endovascular embolization stops nosebleeds

June 23, 2010
Diagnostic Imaging, Diagnostic Imaging Vol 32 No 6, Volume 32, Issue 6

A minimally invasive technique can successfully stop recurrent nosebleeds in patients who are prone to them, according to a radiologist's study published in the Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery.

A minimally invasive technique can successfully stop recurrent nosebleeds in patients who are prone to them, according to a radiologist's study published in the Journal of NeuroInterventional Surgery.

Nosebleeds can be particularly troubling for patients who have had nasal surgery or are taking blood thinners, aspirin, ibuprofen, or blood pressure drugs. In around 6% of cases, recurrent nosebleeds require nasal packing, heat cauterization, or invasive surgery to curb recurrence.

After endovascular embolization using platinum fiber coils, 19 of 20 patients had no further rebleeding, and only one patient had transient facial pain (J NeuroIntervent Surg 2010;2:171-175).

The technique uses a fine guidewire or catheter to insert detachable platinum coils. They expand into a predetermined shape to slow or block the flow of blood.